DRAFT AGENDA
 
REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY

DECEMBER 6, 2022
  COUNCIL CHAMBERS
211 WEST ASPEN AVENUE

3:00 P.M.

All City Council Meetings are live streamed on the city's website (https://www.flagstaff.az.gov/1461/Streaming-City-Council-Meetings)

***PUBLIC COMMENT***


Verbal public comments may be given through a virtual public comment platform or in-person

If you want to provide a verbal comment during the Council Meeting, use the link below to join the virtual public comment room.

VIRTUAL PUBLIC COMMENT WAITING ROOM
 

Written comments may be submitted to publiccomment@flagstaffaz.gov. All comments submitted via email will be considered written comments and will be documented into the record as such.

 
             
1.
CALL TO ORDER
 
NOTICE OF OPTION TO RECESS INTO EXECUTIVE SESSION
 
Pursuant to A.R.S. §38-431.02, notice is hereby given to the members of the City Council and to the general public that, at this regular meeting, the City Council may vote to go into executive session, which will not be open to the public, for legal advice and discussion with the City’s attorneys for legal advice on any item listed on the following agenda, pursuant to A.R.S. §38-431.03(A)(3).
 
2. ROLL CALL
 
NOTE: One or more Councilmembers may be in attendance through other technological means.
 
MAYOR DEASY
VICE MAYOR SWEET
COUNCILMEMBER ASLAN
COUNCILMEMBER HOUSE
 

COUNCILMEMBER MCCARTHY
COUNCILMEMBER SALAS
COUNCILMEMBER SHIMONI
 
 
3.
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE, MISSION STATEMENT, AND LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
 
MISSION STATEMENT
 
The mission of the City of Flagstaff is to protect and enhance the quality of life for all.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
 
The Flagstaff City Council humbly acknowledges the ancestral homelands of this area’s Indigenous nations and original stewards. These lands, still inhabited by Native descendants, border mountains sacred to Indigenous peoples. We honor them, their legacies, their traditions, and their continued contributions. We celebrate their past, present, and future generations who will forever know this place as home.
 
4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM PREVIOUS MEETINGS
 
A.   Consideration and Approval of Minutes: City Council Regular Meeting of October 19, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 2, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 16, 2021, Work Session of November 30, 2021, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of October 25, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 1, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 8, 2022, and Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 15, 2022.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
Approve the minutes of the City Council Regular Meeting of October 19, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 2, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 16, 2021, Work Session of November 30, 2021, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of October 25, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 1, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 8, 2022, and Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 15, 2022.
 
5. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Public Participation enables the public to address the Council about an item that is not on the agenda. Comments relating to items that are on the agenda will be taken at the time that the item is discussed. If you wish to address the Council at tonight's meeting, please complete a comment card and submit it to the recording clerk as soon as possible. Your name will be called when it is your turn to speak. You may address the Council up to three times throughout the meeting, including comments made during Public Participation. Please limit your remarks to three minutes per item to allow everyone an opportunity to speak. At the discretion of the Chair, ten or more persons present at the meeting and wishing to speak may appoint a representative who may have no more than fifteen minutes to speak.
 
6.
COUNCIL LIAISON REPORTS
 
7. APPOINTMENTS

Pursuant to A.R.S. §38-431.02, notice is hereby given to the members of the City Council and to the general public that the City Council may vote to go into executive session, which will not be open to the public, for the purpose of discussing or considering employment, assignment, appointment, promotion, demotion, dismissal, salaries, disciplining or resignation of a public officer, appointee, or employee of any public body...., pursuant to A.R.S. §38-431.03(A)(1).
 
A.   Consideration of Appointment: Commission on Diversity Awareness.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
Make one appointment to a term expiring September 2023.
 
8. CONSENT ITEMS
 
All matters under Consent Agenda are considered by the City Council to be routine and will be enacted by one motion approving the recommendations listed on the agenda. Unless otherwise indicated, expenditures approved by Council are budgeted items.
 
A.   Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Contract for Purchase of Materials/Services from Flagstaff Equipment Co., Inc. for one (1) Bobcat Telehandler Forklift for the Flagstaff Airport in the amount of $113,921.38 (plus applicable taxes).
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
  1. Approve Contract for Purchase of Materials/Services from Flagstaff Equipment Co., Inc, for the purchase of one (1) Bobcat Telehandler Forklift for the Flagstaff Airport in the amount of $113,921.38 (plus applicable taxes); and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute all necessary documents. 
 
B.   Consideration and Approval of Final: Request from TLC PC Golf, LLC, for Final Plat approval for Club Cabin Condominiums Unit 2 at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1—a three-unit residential condominium subdivision on 10.88 acres at 3000 S. Clubhouse Circle.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
Approve the Final Plat and authorize the Mayor to sign the Final Plat and City/Subdivider Agreement when notified by staff that all documents are ready for signature and recordation.
 
C.   Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Contract for Materials and Services to CTS Civil, LLC for grinding, hauling, and stockpiling green waste in the amount of $198,000.00.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
  1. Approve the Contract for Materials and Services with CTS Civil, LLC, for grinding, hauling, and stockpiling green waste in the amount of $198,000.00; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
 
D.   Consideration and Approval of Contract: First Amendment to the Contract for Professional Services with Lancaster Leadership, LLC for On-Call Organizational Consulting, Facilitation and Training Services for an additional amount of $60,000.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
  1. Approve the First Amendment to the Contract for Professional Services with Lancaster Leadership, LLC for On-Call Organizational Consulting, Facilitation and Training Services for an additional amount of $60,000; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
 
E.   Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Contract for Services & Materials with Goble Sampson Assoc., Inc. for a MIOX Mixed Oxidant On-Site Generator in the amount of $60,127, plus taxes and fees.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
  1. Approve the Contract for Services & Materials with Goble Sampson Assoc., Inc. for a MIOX Mixed Oxidant On-Site Generator in the amount of $60,127, plus taxes and fees; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
 
F.   Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Amendment to Cooperative Purchase Contract for Real Estate Appraisal Valuations with Landpro Valuation, LLC for additional work and cost in the amount of $14,000 related to property acquisitions for the Switzer Canyon Water Transmission Main Phase IV Project and a future trail connection.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
  1. Approve the Amendment to Cooperative Purchase Contract for Real Estate Appraisal Valuations with Landpro Valuation, LLC in the amount of $14,000 in addition to other fees and taxes for property acquisitions necessary for the Appraisal Services for Water Transmission Main Phase IV Projectt; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
 
9. ROUTINE ITEMS
 
A.   Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-24:  an ordinance of the Flagstaff City Council authorizing the acquisition of real property interests for the Milton Road and University Avenue Right-of-Way Project; providing for delegation of authority, repeal of conflicting ordinances, severability, clerical corrections, and establishing an effective date
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-24 by title only for the final time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-24 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-24
 
B.   Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-31:  An Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Flagstaff, abandoning approximately 5,237 square feet of public right-of-way at the northwest corner of Fountaine Street and Hoskins Avenue; providing for delegation of authority, repeal of conflicting ordinance, severability, and establishing an effective date
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-31 by title only for the final time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-31 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-31
 
C.   Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Construction Manager at Risk Construction Services Agreement with Eagle Mountain Construction, Inc. for the Beulah/University Roadway Project.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
  1. Approve the Construction Manager at Risk Construction Services Agreement with Eagle Mountain Construction for a Guaranteed Maximum Price of $19,010,333.00 and a contract duration of 850 calendar days; 
  2. Approve an Owner’s Contingency of $299,000.00, which is 1.55% of the Guaranteed Maximum Price; and
  3. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
 
             
10. PUBLIC HEARING ITEMS
 
A.   Consideration and Adoption of Resolution No. 2022-56: A Resolution of the Flagstaff City Council amending the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 to change the place type designation within a future suburban activity center (S16) from neighborhood scale to regional scale on Maps 21, 22, and 24; move the center point of a future suburban activity center (S16) north and east on Maps 21, 22, and 24; change the area type designation on Map 21 and 22 from Area in White and existing Rural/Future Suburban to Existing Employment for approximately 28 acres; and realign a future circulation road corridor on Map 25 generally located at 1120 W Purple Sage Trail; providing for severability, and establishing an effective date.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
1) Read Resolution No. 2022-56 by title only
2) City Clerk reads Resolution No. 2022-56 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Resolution No. 2022-56
 
11. REGULAR AGENDA
 
A.   Consideration and Adoption of Resolution No. 2022-57:  A resolution naming the Milligan House at the Discover Flagstaff Convention and Visitors Bureau administration facility the "Debbi L. Grogan Memorial CVB Conference Room."
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
1) Read Resolution No. 2022-57 by title only
2) City Clerk reads Resolution No. 2022-57 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Resolution No. 2022-57
 
B.   Consideration and Adoption: Thorpe Park Annex Concept
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
Adopt the concept for Thorpe Park Annex as currently designed.
 
C.   Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-33: an Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Flagstaff, amending the Flagstaff City Code Title 7, Health and Sanitation, Chapter 7-08, Extension and Reimbursement Agreements for the Construction of Water and Sewer Line, and Title 13, Engineering Design Standards and Specification for New Infrastructure, Chapter 13-09 Water, Sewer, and Other Underground Utilities, by amending the Reimbursement Agreement provisions to allow a longer maximum payback period; repeal of conflicting ordinances, severability, authority for clerical corrections, and establishing an effective date.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
At the December 6, 2022 Council Meeting:
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only for the first time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only (if approved above)
At the December 20, 2022 Council Meeting:
3) Read Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only for the final time
4) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only (if approved above)
5) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-33
 
D.   Consideration and Adoption of Resolution No. 2022-59:  A resolution of the Flagstaff City Council, adopting the 2022 revisions to the Flagstaff Carbon Neutrality Plan
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
1) Read Resolution No. 2022-59 by title only
2) City Clerk reads Resolution No. 2022-59 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Resolution No. 2022-59
 
E.   Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-34: Nuisance Vehicle Noise Ordinance
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
At the December 6, 2022 Council Meeting:
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only for the first time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only (if approved above)
At the December 20, 2022 Council Meeting:
3) Read Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only for the final time
4) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only (if approved above)
5) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-34
 
12. FUTURE AGENDA ITEM REQUESTS

After discussion and upon agreement by three members of the Council, an item will be moved to a regularly-scheduled Council meeting.
 
A.   Future Agenda Item Request (F.A.I.R.): A Citizens' Petition titled Timely Public Access to Traffic Study Data
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
Council direction. 
 
B.   Future Agenda Item Request (F.A.I.R.): A Citizens' Petition titled Traffic Calming in Boulder Pointe.
 
  STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
 
Council direction. 
 
13. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
 
14. INFORMATIONAL ITEMS TO/FROM MAYOR, COUNCIL, AND STAFF, AND FUTURE AGENDA ITEM REQUESTS
 
15. ADJOURNMENT
 
 
CERTIFICATE OF POSTING OF NOTICE
The undersigned hereby certifies that a copy of the foregoing notice was duly posted at Flagstaff City Hall on                      , at                a.m./p.m. in accordance with the statement filed by the City Council with the City Clerk.

Dated this               day of                                       , 2022.



__________________________________________
Stacy Saltzburg, MMC, City Clerk                                             
 
4.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Stacy Saltzburg, City Clerk
Date: 11/23/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Minutes: City Council Regular Meeting of October 19, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 2, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 16, 2021, Work Session of November 30, 2021, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of October 25, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 1, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 8, 2022, and Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 15, 2022.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Approve the minutes of the City Council Regular Meeting of October 19, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 2, 2021, Regular Meeting of November 16, 2021, Work Session of November 30, 2021, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of October 25, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 1, 2022, Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 8, 2022, and Special Meeting (Executive Session) of November 15, 2022.
Executive Summary:
Minutes of City Council meetings are a requirement of Arizona Revised Statutes and, additionally, provide a method of informing the public of discussions and actions being taken by the City Council.
Financial Impact:
None
Policy Impact:
None
Connection to PBB Key Community Priorities/Objectives & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Effective Governance
Previous Council Decision on This:
None

Attachments: 10.19.2021 CCRM
11.02.2021 CCRM
11.16.2021 CCRM
11.30.2021 CCWS
10.25.2022 CCSMES
11.01.2022 CCSMES
11.08.2022 CCSMES
11.15.2022 CCSMES
 
7.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Stacy Fobar, Deputy City Clerk
Date: 11/16/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration of Appointment: Commission on Diversity Awareness.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Make one appointment to a term expiring September 2023.
Executive Summary:
The Commission on Diversity Awareness consists of seven citizens who represent the diverse population of Flagstaff. The mission of the commission includes, but is not limited to, fostering mutual understanding, tolerance, respect, and awareness among all citizens; recognizing the different economic, cultural, social, religious, and ethnic groups within the City; cooperating in the development of educational programs dedicated to improving community relations and enlisting support of various groups to foster diversity awareness.

There is one appointment to be made due to the upcoming ineligibility of a previously appointed commissioner who is moving out of state for a new work opportunity.

There are four applications on file for consideration by the Council as follows:
  • Lazarus Melan (new applicant)
  • Angelica Maria Sanchez (new applicant)
  • Doris Ewurabena Mensah (new applicant)
  • Steven Thompson (new applicant)
In an effort to reduce exposure to personal information the applicant roster and application will be submitted to the City Council separately.

COUNCIL APPOINTMENT ASSIGNMENT: Councilmember Salas
Financial Impact:
These are voluntary positions and there is no budgetary impact on the City of Flagstaff.
Policy Impact:
Not applicable.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
There is no Council goal that specifically addresses appointments to Boards and Commissions; however, boards and commissions to provide input and recommendations based on City Council goals that may pertain to the board or commission work plan.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
None
Options and Alternatives:
1) Appoint one Commissioner: By appointing one member at this time, the Commission on Diversity Awareness will be at full membership, allowing the group to meet and provide recommendations to the City Council.

2) Postpone the action to allow for further discussion or expand the list of candidates.
Background/History:
The City's boards, commissions, and committees were created to foster public participation and input and to encourage Flagstaff citizens to take an active role in city government.
Community Involvement:
INFORM: The vacancies are posted on the City's website and individual recruitment and mention of the opening by Commission members and City staff has occurred, informing others of this vacancy through word of mouth.

Attachments: CODA - Authority
 
8.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Timothy Skinner, ARFF Manager
Date: 10/24/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Contract for Purchase of Materials/Services from Flagstaff Equipment Co., Inc. for one (1) Bobcat Telehandler Forklift for the Flagstaff Airport in the amount of $113,921.38 (plus applicable taxes).
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
  1. Approve Contract for Purchase of Materials/Services from Flagstaff Equipment Co., Inc, for the purchase of one (1) Bobcat Telehandler Forklift for the Flagstaff Airport in the amount of $113,921.38 (plus applicable taxes); and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute all necessary documents. 
Executive Summary:
Snow and ice contaminants on runways, taxiways, and ramps pose a hazard for aircraft operating during periods of inclement weather. To address this, the Flagstaff Airport provides snow and ice control for the runways, taxiways, and ramps using specialized snow removal equipment. In 2020, the Flagstaff Airport purchased two (2) deicing material spreaders using FAA grant funding for the purposes of dispensing granular chemicals in efforts to address ice build up on the runways and taxiways.
The deicing material sacks weigh 2000 lb. and must to be loaded into the bed of the material spreaders. The telehandler forklift is used to unload the pallets of deicing materials off of shipment trucks, and then used to load the materials into the material spreaders. The purchase of this equipment has been approved by the Fleet Management Committee. This piece of equipment will be crucial in supporting the airport's Snow and Ice Control Plan (SICP).

The telehandler forklift will also be used to move, offload, and reposition attachments, plow blade edges, broom cores, and other equipment needed to support the snow removal equipment and snow and ice control operations.
Financial Impact:
The Airport Section has $115,000.00 budget capacity in the Operating Capital line item for fiscal year 2022-2023 in account 221-07-221-0882-0-4402.
Policy Impact:
None.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
The purchase of this equipment would support PBB Key Community Priorities and Objectives by: Serving the public by providing high quality customer service, as well as providing effective management of and infrastructure for all modes of transportation through means of removing ice buildup on that airport runways and taxiways. 

Carbon Neutrality Plan
 
Regional Plan
The purchase of this equipment supports the Flagstaff Regional Plan:Goal T.2. Improve transportation safety and efficiency for all modes. 
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
No.
Options and Alternatives:
  1. Approve the purchase contract for one (1) Bobcat Telehandler Forklift from Flagstaff Equipment Co. Inc, in the amount of $113,921.38 (plus taxes); or
  2. Direct staff to rent a similar piece of equipment for a greater cost of approximately $3,500 per month; or
  3. Not approve the purchase. 
Background/History:
The Flagstaff Airport Operations team has researched various methods and equipment to assist with the unloading, repositioning, and loading of deicing materials used for snow and ice control operations. Due to the height of the material spreader vehicles, as well as the weight of the deicing materials, a telescoping (telehandler) forklift was chosen as the safest and most efficient piece of equipment. Staff rented a similar type of equipment for the 2021-2022 winter season and found it to be very effective. 

In addition to being used for deicing materials, the telehandler was also used for moving and repositioning snow removal equipment attachments, replacement plow blade edges, broom core parts and other heavy parts and materials. Purchasing this equipment enables the airport to support critical snow and ice control operations. It also eliminates the need to rent a similar piece of equipment that is very costly and the availability is not guaranteed.  

Purchasing Section posted an Invitation for Bids (IFB) solicitation for a Telehandler Forklift for Airport on the PlanetBids website September 16, 2022 and advertised the IFB in the Arizona Daily Sun on September 25, and October 2, 2022. There were two (2) bids received and opened electronically on October 6, 2022. A summary of the bids received are identified below. Flagstaff Equipment Co, Inc. was determined to be the lowest responsive and responsible bidder.

Flg Equipment Co. - $113,921.38
Technology International, Inc. - $300,850.00
Key Considerations:
The purchase of this piece of equipment will support snow and ice control operations at the Flagstaff Airport. The purchase of this equipment will also support the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) required Snow and Ice Control Plan (SICP) of the Flagstaff Airport. Purchasing this piece of equipment will eliminate the need to rent a similar type of equipment every Winter season.
Expanded Financial Considerations:
None.
Community Benefits and Considerations:
The community benefit will be a greater impact to snow and ice control and snow equipment operations at the Flagstaff Airport.
Community Involvement:
None.
Expanded Options and Alternatives:
The alternative for purchasing this equipment is to have staff at the Flagstaff Airport attempt to rent a similar piece of equipment for the entire Winter season at a cost of approximately $3,500.00 a month. The availability and reliability of renting a similar piece of equipment is very concerning and could cause interruptions snow and ice control operations at the Flagstaff Airport.

Attachments: Contract
Photo
 
8.B.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Genevieve Pearthree, Senior Planner
Date: 10/25/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Final: Request from TLC PC Golf, LLC, for Final Plat approval for Club Cabin Condominiums Unit 2 at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1—a three-unit residential condominium subdivision on 10.88 acres at 3000 S. Clubhouse Circle.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Approve the Final Plat and authorize the Mayor to sign the Final Plat and City/Subdivider Agreement when notified by staff that all documents are ready for signature and recordation.
Executive Summary:
This is a request for Final Plat approval for a three-unit residential condominium subdivision known as Club Cabin Condominiums Unit 2 at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1 located at 3000 S. Clubhouse Circle on 10.88 acres in the R1 (Single-Family Residential) Zone.
Financial Impact:
No financial liabilities are anticipated by the approval of this Final Plat.
Policy Impact:
There are no policy impacts affiliated with this Final Plat.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Carbon Neutrality Plan
  • DD-1:  Encourage vibrancy, appropriate density, and attainability in existing neighborhoods, so that more residents live within walking distance of their daily needs.

PBB Key Community Priorities/Objectives
  • Robust Resilient Economy - Grow and strengthen a more equitable and resilient economy.

Flagstaff Regional Plan
  • Policy LU.2.2. Design new development to coordinate with existing and future development, in an effort to preserve viewsheds, strengthen connectivity, and establish compatible and mutually supportive land uses.
  • Policy LU.5.1. Encourage development patterns within the designated growth boundaries to sustain efficient infrastructure projects and maintenance.
  • Policy LU.5.2. Promote infill development over peripheral expansion to conserve environmental resources, spur economic investments, and reduce the cost of providing infrastructure and services.
  • Policy LU.5.3. Promote compact development appropriate to and within the context of each area type: urban, suburban, and rural.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
  • City Council approved the Preliminary Plat for the Club Cabin Condominiums Unit 2 at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1 on March 3, 2021.
  • City Council approved the Final Plat for the Club Cabin Condominiums at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1 on September 17, 2019, a four-unit residential condominium subdivision on the same parcel as the Club Cabin Condominiums 2 Preliminary Plat. City Council approved the Preliminary Plat for the Club Cabin Condominiums at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1 on August 27, 2019.
Options and Alternatives:
1. Approve the Final Plat with no conditions.
2. Approve the Final Plat with conditions. 
3. Deny the Final Plat based on non-compliance with the Zoning Code, the Subdivision Code, and/or the Engineering Design Standards and Specifications for New Infrastructure.
Background/History:
On December 4, 2020, the Inter-Division Staff approved a Site Plan for three new 5,096 sq. ft., detached residential units (PZ-20-00139-02) on Tract K of the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1 subdivision plat. Civil plans for these three cabins are currently under review, and Building Permit applications will be submitted shortly. New water service and a fire hydrant have been provided for this project.
 
The three cabins in this application are in addition to four cabins on Tract K that previously received Site Plan approval in 2016 (PZ-15-00111-02) and were subsequently platted as condominiums (PZ-18-00168-02). Four of the seven cabins are finished, and several are under construction.
Key Considerations:
The 2020 Site Plan approval of the project signifies it complies with the standards in Title 10: Zoning Code and Title 13: Engineering Design Standards and Specifications for New Infrastructure. However, the developer has opted to create a condominium plat to separate ownership of each unit from ownership of the land beneath. In this case, the units are defined as the airspace extending 40’ above the building footprint. The airspace includes all components of each structure, including porches and balconies. Shared areas such as the sidewalks and the parking area are considered “common elements.”
 
The three proposed units also comply with the regulations in Title 11: General Plans and Subdivisions, as evidenced by Inter-Division Staff approval of the Preliminary Plat on December 4, 2020.
Community Benefits and Considerations:
The Club Cabin Condominiums Unit 2 at the Estates at Pine Canyon Unit 1 will provide a place to stay for Pine Canyon members and their families, and prospective Pine Canyon residents.
Community Involvement:
Inform. No public hearings or public outreach are required by either the Zoning Code or the Subdivision Code as part of the Preliminary Subdivision Plat review process.

Attachments: Final Plat
Final Plat Application
City/Subdivider Agreement
 
8.C.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Matthew Morales, Project Manager
Co-Submitter: Scott Overton
Date: 10/20/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Contract for Materials and Services to CTS Civil, LLC for grinding, hauling, and stockpiling green waste in the amount of $198,000.00.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
  1. Approve the Contract for Materials and Services with CTS Civil, LLC, for grinding, hauling, and stockpiling green waste in the amount of $198,000.00; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
Executive Summary:
Cinder Lake Landfill (CLL) receives trees, shrubs, limbs, and stumps (also known as green waste) from residents and commercial customers. Since 2006, green waste has been mechanically shredded (ground) by landfill staff and used as an additive to soil cover. In 2020 and the years since, the landfill scales recorded dramatic tonnage increases in green waste delivery. Existing landfill staff and personal have struggled keeping up with the grinding operation due to work volume and tasks to complete daily landfill operations.

The 2-acre stockpile is suspected to have caused the area underneath to settle and promote pooling of rainwater below. In June 2020, the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) issued a notice of violation and the concern was addressed by city staff reducing the loading concern. Staff implemented minor corrections in the immediate area of concern, but the 2022 monsoon season confirmed that a more aggressive approach was necessary. Removing the stockpile of green waste will allow staff to divert water from the site and eliminate pooling in the immediate area.

Staff proposes to hire CTS Civil, LLC to grind, haul, and stockpile the existing quanity of green waste to a location on-site where it will not effect stormwater conveyance.
Financial Impact:
This was not an approved item in the FY 2022-2023 budget. However, commercial green waste revenues over the past two years ($219,000) will cover the cost of the proposed Contract. This Contract will not affect any projects that were already approved for the FY 2022-2023 Solid Waste budget. As an unbudgeted need, this Contract was approved by the budget team in October, 2022.
Policy Impact:
Improvement of the site and processing of the green waste will result in a large quantity of green waste chip material.  The green waste program is being evaluated for continued success and may need to be modified for a more sustainable operations into the future.  This program clearly has community popularity and strong use and staff will be looking into the operations needs for future years.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
High Performance Governance
  • Serve the public by providing high quality customer service
  • Enhance the organizations fiscal stability & increase efficiency and effectiveness
Safe & Healthy Community
  • Ensure the built environment is safe through the use of consistent standards, rules and regulations, and land use practices.
 Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure
  • Utilize existing long-range plan(s) that identify the community's future infrastructure needs and all associated costs.
  • Deliver outstanding services to residents through a healthy, well maintained infrastructure system.
  • Provide effective management of and infrastructure for all modes of transportation.
  • Facilitate and develop carbon-neutral energy opportunities.
Environmental Stewardship
  • Promote, protect, & enhance a healthy, sustainable environment & its natural resources.
  • Implement, maintain & further the Climate Action & Adaptation Plan (CAAP) with awareness of social inequities.
  • Strengthen flagstaff's resilience to climate change impacts on built, natural, economic, health, & social systems.
Carbon Neutrality Plan
Community Resilience
CR-1: Ensure all mitigation actions improve Flagstaff's ability to adapt to the future.
CR-2: Strengthen existing community systems to create resilience to both short-term shocks and long-term change.

Equitable Systems
Design Targeted climate policies and programs to serve vulnerable communities first

Sustainable Consumption and Waste Management
MM-2: Encourage sustainable consumption.

Regional Plan
Goal E.2 - Expand production and use of renewable energy.

Goal PF.1 - Work across all government operations and services to prepare for the impacts of natural and human caused hazards.

Goal PF.2 - Provide sustainable and equitable public facilities, service, and infrastructure systems in an efficient and effective manner to serve all population areas and demographics.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
There are no previous City Council decisions on this item.
Options and Alternatives:
  1. Approve the Contract for Materials and Services with CTS Civil, LLC in the amount of $198,000.00; or
  2. Continue to grind green waste on site using city staffing and resources; or
  3. Remove unprocessed green waste and bury it in the Cinder Lake Landfill.
Background/History:
Since 2006 Cinder Lake Landfill has been shredding (aka grinding) green waste as a beneficial amendment to disposed paper millings from the SCA Tissue plant (no longer in operation). The mixture of ground green waste and paper millings from SCA Tissue still provide a valuable source of alternative daily cover (aka ADC) for the Cinder Lake Landfill.

The Cinder Lake Landfill grinder is a 600-horsepower low-rpm, high-torque machine that can grind stumps up to six-feet in diameter. The average processing rate is 80 tons per hour and the unit can typically run for three hours before routine operations and maintenance is required. The average cost to operate the machine is $258 per hour (2018).

Historically, green waste disposal volumes were manageable enough to process in-house. However, over the past three years a noticeable increase in green waste disposal occurred (see Table 1 below).
 
Table 1-Greenwaste Disposal Trends at Cinder Lake Landfill
Fiscal Year Green Waste Disposal (tons)
FY 17 479
FY 18 528
FY 19 504
FY 20 1,093
FY 21 1,780
FY 22 3,304

To grind the existing pile of green waste would take approximately Cinder Lake Landfill staff approximately 230 days (based on typical production rates and routine maintenance on the grinder).

On September 13, 2022, the Purchasing Section posted an Invitation for Bids (IFB) solicitation for green waste removal services on the PlanetBids website and advertised the IFB in the Arizona Daily Sun on September 18, and 25, 2022. There were five (5) bids received and opened electronically on September 29, 2022. A summary of the bids received are identified below. CTS Civil, LLC was determined to be the lowest responsive and responsible bidder.

CTS - $198,000.00
Rummel Construction - $212,852.00
Joe Dirt - $220,000.00
Southwest Sitework - $269,000.00
Smithco - $427,000.00
Key Considerations:
1.  Staff has been collaborating with ADEQ toward an integrated approach for mitigating stormwater runoff at the site. In the fall of 2021, operations staff re-graded discrete portions of the site where runoff could be contained. However, the 2022 summer monsoon resulted in additional runoff issues at a location just above the site. It was determined that the green waste required processing and removal. The manpower required to grind the 2-acre pile would overextend our staff's duties and cost approximately $258/hour (2018 study) and take 230 days to complete. Therefore, hiring a qualified contractor such as CTS Civil, LLC will expedite removing the stockpile of green waste and maintain compliance.

2. Capital re-investment for new equipment (grinder and front-end loader) would be approximately $1.25 million, with no payback period in the foreseeable future.

3. Commercial customers are charged the typical fee of $45.75 per ton for disposal of green waste at CLL. Revenues generated from disposal over the past two years (approximately $219,000) will adequately cover the costs for a third party to process and haul the material. 

4. Green waste has proven to be essential amendment to the Cinder Lake Landfill's daily cover needs. It is also accepted through the City residential bulky trash collection and firewise programs. 

5. The stockpile of paper millings will diminish in approximately three years and there is already a surplus of ground wood waste on site. Therefore, staff is exploring other beneficial uses of green waste; burial is a last option. Cinder Lake Landfill has already implemented new cover strategies that will extend the life of the landfill by four to six years.

6. CTS Civil, LLC is a company that has specialized in green waste processing and reuse. They currently work for clients such as the City of Tempe and the Maricopa County.
Expanded Financial Considerations:
The trend of increasing green waste disposal is likely to continue unless an alternative market can be realized for the material. Employing additional Operators and purchasing new equipment is not recommended as a long-term solution at this time. Staff continues to research more sustainable operations options as the green waste program will demand evaluation.
Community Benefits and Considerations:
Approval of this Contract for Materials and Services will allow Cinder Lake Landfill to maintain compliance with ADEQ. Meanwhile, the community will benefit by knowing that the City of Flagstaff will continue to provide reliable and safe disposal options for the region.
Community Involvement:
There was no community involvement for this Contract.
Expanded Options and Alternatives:
No expanded options or alternatives are considered for this Contract at this time.

Attachments: Contract
 
8.D.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Shannon Anderson, Senior Deputy City Manager
Co-Submitter: Alan Keay, Human Resources Manager and Patrick Brown, Purchasing Director
Date: 11/02/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Contract: First Amendment to the Contract for Professional Services with Lancaster Leadership, LLC for On-Call Organizational Consulting, Facilitation and Training Services for an additional amount of $60,000.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
  1. Approve the First Amendment to the Contract for Professional Services with Lancaster Leadership, LLC for On-Call Organizational Consulting, Facilitation and Training Services for an additional amount of $60,000; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
Executive Summary:
The City of Flagstaff has been preparing to implement a pay for performance evaluation methodology following the implementation of the compensation study in fiscal year 2021-2022.  

Human Resources conducted a request for proposal process in 2019 for on-call organizational consulting, facilitation, and training services. Lancaster Leadership, LLC was selected for the on-call services list as a result of that formal solicitation process. Human Resources has selected Lancaster Leadership, LLC to lead the citywide training on performance evaluations.  This training program will include:
  • training kick-off for 150 evaluating supervisors in a remote session to discuss pay for performance;
  • phase I of 10 half day training sessions to discuss managing the employee performance lifecycle, how to best use the tools provided, completing evaluations timely, and the rating scale
  • phase 2 of 10 2-hour sessions of group coaching to help reinforce practice and implementation of what was shared in training
  • phase 3 of 10 half day training sessions to continue reinforcing change in performance management culture and pay for performance
Lancaster Leadership, LLC will design this training specifically based on the City's policies, procedures, forms, and evaluation criteria. Their expertise in leadership, performance management, coaching, and behavior change will be key in transitioning to a pay for performance system.
Financial Impact:
Human Resources has a citywide training budget and this funding is included in account 001-01-01-0024-1-4263.
Policy Impact:
There would not be any policies impacted by hiring Lancaster Leadership, LLC to conduct this training.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
  • Implement innovative local government programs, new ideas and best practices; be recognized as a model for others to follow
  • Become an employer of choice and provide employees with the necessary tools, training, and support
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
No.

Attachments: First Amendment
Exhibit A-1 - Scope of Work
 
8.E.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Brian Huntzinger, Water Production Manager
Date: 10/12/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Contract for Services & Materials with Goble Sampson Assoc., Inc. for a MIOX Mixed Oxidant On-Site Generator in the amount of $60,127, plus taxes and fees.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
  1. Approve the Contract for Services & Materials with Goble Sampson Assoc., Inc. for a MIOX Mixed Oxidant On-Site Generator in the amount of $60,127, plus taxes and fees; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
Executive Summary:
Water Production adds chlorine to all water sources in order to maintain water quality throughout the potable water distribution system.  At Foxglenn/Sinagua Wells chlorine is added through the use of an on-site mixed oxidant generator made by MIOX. Over the last couple years the current generator has been having multiple issues requiring extensive maintenance and staff time to keep running; lately requiring resetting nearly every other day. This purchase is an in-kind, though upgraded, replacement of the current mixed oxidant generator made by MIOX. Replacing the generator will ensure water productions ability to safely and effectively deliver and maintain water quality.
Financial Impact:
This purchase was unbudgeted in the FY2022-23 budget.  Budget appropriation within the Water Fund have been identified in accounts 202-08-301-1020-0-4229 and  202-08-301-1011-0-4224 within water production section budget to fund this purchase.
Policy Impact:
None.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives:
Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure: 
1.  Deliver outstanding services to residents through a health, well maintained infrastructure system. 
2.  Utilize existing long-range plan(s) that identify the community's future infrastructure needs and all associated costs.

Carbon Neutrality Plan
CR-1:  Ensure all mitigation actions improve Flagstaff's ability to adapt to the future. 
CR-2:  Strengthen existing community systems to create resilience to both short-term shocks and long term change.

Regional Plan
Goal WR.2.  Manage a coordinated system of water, wastewater, and reclaimed water utility service facilities and resources at the City level and identify funding to pay for new resources.  Policy WR.2.2 Maintain and develop facilities to provide reliable, safe, and cost effective water, wastewater, and reclaimed water services.

Goal WR.4.  Logically enhance and extend the City's public water, wastewater, and reclaimed water services including their treatment, distribution, and collection systems in both urbanized and newly developed areas of the City to provide an efficient delivery of services.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
Foxglenn/Sinagua Wellhouse modifications (including generator replacement) were approved by Council on June 16, 2009.  However, there most likely have not been council decisions specifically on mixed oxidant generator replacements before.
Options and Alternatives:
  1. Approve the purchase of the in-kind replacement MIOX mixed oxidant generator; or
  2. Do not approve the purchase and require that staff to pursue other options such as using chlorine gas at EPDS004 (Foxglenn/Sinagua Wellhouse).
Background/History:
In order to maintain water quality within the potable water distribution system water production adds chlorine to all potable water sources or Entry Points to the Distribution System (EPDSs). In most locations chlorine gas is used to provide chlorine to treated source water. Due to the proximity of nearby schools and the public chlorine gas is not used at EPDS004 (Foxglenn/Sinagua Wells) though and instead sodium hypochlorite and other oxidants are generated on-site through a mixed oxidant generator for additional safety. Water Production has been using MIOX on-site mixed oxidant generators for over twenty years. In the late 1990's EPDS004 was initially designed with a MIOX generator when only Foxglenn Well was supplying it.  A decade or so later, in 2009 when Sinagua Well was added to the EPDS the MIOX generator in use was replaced with a larger capacity one.  The current generator, now 13 years old, has been having multiple issues over the last couple years requiring extensive maintenance and staff time to keep running including: faulting daily on cell overtemp, issues with the metering pump, water float, solenoid and softeners. Replacing the current generator with an in-kind, upgraded, replacement generator will ensure water productions ability to safely and effectively deliver and maintain water quality to the public.

The Procurement Department has worked with Water Services to deemed this purchase proprietary and this product is the only one that can work with our current infrastructure.
Expanded Financial Considerations:
Using an on-site mixed oxidant generator, which requires only electricity, water and salt to operate, alleviates the necessity to purchase chlorine gas, which has increased in cost at least 4 times in the last year from vendors due to supply chain shortages, possible railroad strikes etc.

Attachments: Contract
Exhibit A - Quote
 
8.F.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Bryce Doty, Real Estate Manager
Date: 11/01/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Amendment to Cooperative Purchase Contract for Real Estate Appraisal Valuations with Landpro Valuation, LLC for additional work and cost in the amount of $14,000 related to property acquisitions for the Switzer Canyon Water Transmission Main Phase IV Project and a future trail connection.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
  1. Approve the Amendment to Cooperative Purchase Contract for Real Estate Appraisal Valuations with Landpro Valuation, LLC in the amount of $14,000 in addition to other fees and taxes for property acquisitions necessary for the Appraisal Services for Water Transmission Main Phase IV Projectt; and
  2. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
Executive Summary:
On August 16th, 2021,  the City entered into a cooperative purchase contract with Landpro Valuation for appraisal services for the Switzer Water Main Transmission Phase IV Project. Appraisals are required as part of the property acquisition process.

The City is now seeking appraisals for access road and maintenance road access easements.  The road easements will enable Water Services to use existing private roads to access waterline valves and hydrants.  The City is taking this action at the request of property owners whose properties are affected by the Project.

A property owner has agreed to sell the City a trail easement, in addition to the waterline and temporary construction easements for the Project, based upon appraised value. The City needs to obtain an appraisal of the trail easement.  The future trail is identified in the newly adopted Active Transportation Master Plan, and is part of an existing social trail that runs through the valley. 

The contract amendment will bring the annual aggregate total contract price above $50,000, requiring City Council approval. 
Financial Impact:
The additional appraisals increase the cost of the contract by $14,000.  Of this amount, $12,000 will be funded within the Water Services Fund in account number 202-08-370-3157-0-4421 with a total budget in FY2022-23 of $200,000 for the project.  The remaining $2,000 will be funded with Flagstaff Urban Trail System and Open Space bond dollars in account number 403-09-421-3247-5-4431.
Policy Impact:
None.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives

Safe and Healthy Community -
  • Foster a safe, secure, and healthy community.
  • Ensure the built environment is safe through the use of consistent standards, rules and regulations, and land use practices.
Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure -
  • Deliver outstanding services to residents through a healthy, well maintained infrastructure system.
  • Utilize existing long-range plans that identify the community's future infrastructure needs and all associated costs.
  • Identify smart traffic management, multi modal transportation, and alternative energy opportunities.
Regional Plan

Goal WR.2. Manage a coordinated system of water, wastewater, and reclaimed water utility service facilities and resources at the City level and identify funding to pay for new resources.

Goal WR.3. Satisfy current and future human water demands and the needs of the natural environment through sustainable and renewable water resources and strategic conservation measures.

Goal WR.4. Logically enhance and extend the City’s public water, wastewater, and reclaimed water services including their treatment, distribution, and collection systems in both urbanized and newly developed areas of the City to provide an efficient delivery of services.
 
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
No
Background/History:
The City of Flagstaff began the Switzer Canyon Water Transmission Main Project in 2012 and has completed the first three phases.  The project started at the intersection of Switzer Canyon Road and Route 66 and headed north and up Turquoise and across Forest Avenue to Fir Avenue and west on Fir to the Elks Lodge at San Francisco Street.  Phase IV and V are the final stages to complete the project. The line will be installed going north up San Francisco Street and generally follow the existing 16" water line across private property located in unincorporated Coconino County to City reservoirs for approximately two miles.

The City is securing easement rights along this corridor for a new water transmission main. In response to property owner requests to minimize disturbance of natural areas,  The City now plans to access valves through existing private roads for routine maintenance versus using the waterline easement.  The City is obtaining appraisals and will offer to purchase the necessary access and maintenance road easements based upon appraised value.  

Finally, the appraiser is updating the appraisal reports for the waterline and temporary construction easements for which it was necessary to file a condemnation proceeding. State law provides that a property owner is entitled to be paid just compensation as of the date the summons for a condemnation proceeding is filed (in this case, October 20, 2022).  

Attachments: Amendment to Contract
 
9.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Carmen Pryer, Real Estate Specialist
Co-Submitter: Bryce Doty
Date: 11/18/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-24:  an ordinance of the Flagstaff City Council authorizing the acquisition of real property interests for the Milton Road and University Avenue Right-of-Way Project; providing for delegation of authority, repeal of conflicting ordinances, severability, clerical corrections, and establishing an effective date
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-24 by title only for the final time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-24 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-24
Executive Summary:
Further design efforts on Milton Road and University Avenue right-of-way project have identified additional property acquisitions in order to deliver the project. Adoption of this ordinance will authorize the acquisition of all of the real property interests required for the project, as required by the Flagstaff City Charter.
Financial Impact:
In May 2000, the Flagstaff voters approved Proposition 403 which provided funding for improvements to Traffic Flow and Safety. As part of this proposition, two of those projects apply to the Project. These two projects were the University Avenue Realignment and Beulah Boulevard Extension.

City Staff completed a preliminary realignment plan and programmed $7.4 million in the FY2015 Capital Improvement Program Summary. In FY2023, an additional $9.2M was budgeted for the Project from the 419 Transportation Tax. These two allocations provided a combined total $16.6M for the Project.

Vintage Partners, LLC, will also contribute $1.65M for the pedestrian underpass commitment. It should be noted that VP is responsible for all costs associated with the pedestrian underpass and per Amendment One to the DA, those costs must be repaid to the City within five (5) years.
Policy Impact:
None. 
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives

Safe and Healthy Community -
  • Foster a safe, secure, and healthy community.
  • Ensure the built environment is safe through the use of consistent standards, rules and regulations, and land use practices.
Inclusive and Engaged Community -
  • Advance social equity and social justice in Flagstaff. 
Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure -
  • Deliver outstanding services to residents through a healthy, well maintained infrastructure system.
  • Utilize existing long-range plans that identify the community's future infrastructure needs and all associated costs.
  • Identify smart traffic management, multi modal transportation, and alternative energy opportunities.
Environmental Stewardship -
  • Implement sustainable building practices and alternative energy and transportation options.
  • Implement, maintain and further the Climate Action and Adaptation Plan.
Regional Plan Goal T.2 -
  • Improve transportation safety and efficiency for all modes.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
City Council previously authorized real property acquisitions related to this project in 2021 as outlined in the Background/History. This ordinance authorizes acquisitions to match the final design of the project, and repeals the prior 2021 ordinance. 
Options and Alternatives:
1. Approve ordinance 
2. Do not approve property acquisitions, and provide other direction.
Background/History:
On May 16, 2000, the voters of Flagstaff passed Proposition 403 which established a local transportation tax rate to provide funding for a variety of transportation system improvements including the arterial and collector street system, and multi-modal elements. The information pamphlet for this proposition specifically identified the Beulah Boulevard extension and the University Avenue realignment as “missing links” within the overall transportation network.  The publicity pamphlet for Proposition 403 showed an alignment for these roadways like the current proposal. A total of $7.375 million has been collected and allocated for these transportation improvements. These funds became 100% available as of July 1, 2017; however, many years of work have been spent on moving this project forward.

In 2005, the City of Flagstaff acquired APN 103-21-002, a 9.58-acre site known as the “Fresquez Parcel” for approximately $2.7 million. This purchase was the first step in moving this transportation project to fruition and provides the majority of right-of-way necessary to accomplish the Beulah Boulevard extension. In order to accomplish the University Avenue/Drive realignment, the ADOT District Offices and Regional Laboratory need to be relocated.  

Following the acquisition of the Fresquez parcel, the City and ADOT began to explore options for partnerships in order to relocate the ADOT facilities. In July 2009, the Arizona P3 (Public-Private-Partnership) Legislation was passed, allowing for partnerships between a public agency (in this case two public agencies) and a private-sector entity to allow greater participation in the delivery of a transportation project. Typically, the public agency assumes all the risks and responsibilities for a transportation project, but under the P3 the private partner takes on some of those risks and responsibilities. The Flagstaff P3 is the first time this initiative has been used to acquire new facilities for ADOT, which will free up land for roadway improvements and redevelopment. A Memorandum of Understanding was executed on March 28, 2012 and set out the parameters for how this P3 project would function. The City and ADOT would combine the remainders of their parcels after right-of-way dedication to be used for redevelopment. The redevelopment parcel would then be traded from ADOT to the developer for relocated ADOT facilities. 

ADOT issued a Request for Qualifications in March 2012 to solicit a private partner who could relocate the ADOT facilities allowing for the construction of the road improvement project. The selected private sector partner was Vintage Partners, who proposed to relocate the ADOT facilities to the former Harkins Theater on Woodlands Village Boulevard. The P3 project was formalized through a Pre-Development Agreement (PDA) between Vintage, the City, and ADOT in December 2014. The PDA provides an overview of the various transactions, authorizes Vintage Partners to prepare and submit required materials for a Site Plan and Rezoning application for ADOT and City property located between Milton Parkway and Beulah Avenue, provides an anticipated schedule, requires an implementation agreement between ADOT and Vintage Partners, provides the term of the agreement, provides remedies for disputes and includes miscellaneous provisions required for an ADOT P3 project.
 
On August 21, 2017, the City Council approved the Reinstatement of, and First Amendment to the P3 Pre-Development Agreement extending the term to December 31, 2017; on December 19, 2017, a Second Amendment was approved that extended the term to March 31, 2018; on March 20, 2018, a Third Amendment was approved that extended the term to June 30, 2018.
 
On April 17, 2018, City Council approved the Development Agreement (DA) between The City and Vintage Partners. The DA provides for the sequence of approvals to facilitate the conveyance of the City Property to ADOT, the relocation of ADOT to the former Harkins Site, and the recordation of the final plat. It acknowledges that other agreements, including an Inter-Governmental Agreement between the City and ADOT, and an Implementation Agreement between ADOT and Vintage, will also speak to the timing and conditions for the property transfers from the City to ADOT, and ADOT to Vintage.
 
On August 18, 2018, City Council approved an IGA between the City and ADOT in order to facilitate the completion of the project.

On December 3, 2019, City Council approved the Mill Town Final Plat.

On September 21, 2021, City Council approved Ordinance No. 2021-18 authorizing property acquisitions for the project. 

City has determined it is appropriate to adopt a new ordinance authorizing the acquisition of real property interests for the project, to conform with updates to the construction plans and legal descriptions for the real property interests to be acquired.
Key Considerations:
The property acquisitions will enable the City to complete planned roadway improvements. Due to the finalization of the plans, and the bike and pedestrian modifications at the 60-percent level, additional ROW was necessary to acquire to construct the roadway project.
Community Benefits and Considerations:
The Project improvements have been identified as an important project to help address traffic congestion on Milton Road.
Community Involvement:
Inform - The public voiced opinions on the proposed P3/Mill Town project during a public hearing which occurred prior to the rezone and development agreement which were approved by the City Council on April 17, 2018.
Involve - Public participation was included in the rezoning process.
Collaborate - P3/Mill Town is certainly a collaboration between the State, City, and Vintage Partners, LLC, a private company, and the public who commented during the public hearing on the rezoning.
Empower - The voters of Flagstaff approved the 2000 Transportation Tax which funded the Fresquez acquisition and the $7.4 million programed in the Capital program for the University/Beulah roadway improvements.

Attachments: Presentation
Ord. 2022-24
Exhibit 1 Chart
Exhibit 2 Legal Descriptions
Parcels and Roadway Map
 
9.B.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Bryce Doty, Real Estate Manager
Date: 11/18/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-31:  An Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Flagstaff, abandoning approximately 5,237 square feet of public right-of-way at the northwest corner of Fountaine Street and Hoskins Avenue; providing for delegation of authority, repeal of conflicting ordinance, severability, and establishing an effective date
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-31 by title only for the final time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-31 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-31
Executive Summary:
Northern Arizona University owns 631 S. Fountaine St., which abuts approximately 7,400 square feet of unimproved public right-of-way dedicated for Hoskins Ave. Northern Arizona University is requesting the City of Flagstaff abandon a portion of Hoskins Avenue. City staff analyzed the request based on existing public uses, future public uses, utility impacts, and consistency with existing plans and standards. City staff recommends abandoning approximately 5,237 square feet of Hoskins Avenue public right- of-way south of 631 S. Fountaine Street, reserving the southern 20’ of Hoskins Avenue right-of-way to accommodate existing public infrastructure needs and a planned Flagstaff Urban Trail System (FUTS) trail identified in the Regional Plan and the Active Transportation Master Plan.

The Planning and Zoning Commission, on October 26, 2022, determined that abandonment is consistent with the General Plan,Zoning Code, any applicable Specific Plan, and all applicable Utilities and Public Works Division standards, and recommended abandonment.  An easement will be reserved for any existing public utilities using the area to be abandoned as public right-of-way.  

If that portion of Hoskins Avenue adjacent to NAU property is abandoned (the 5,237 square feet), then at a future public meeting City staff will bring to Council for consideration an ordinance authorizing the exchange of this property for property of substantially equal value owned by NAU.  The City is seeking to acquire property currently owned by NAU for upcoming capital improvement projects. 
Financial Impact:
None.  The City is simply abandoning the right-of-way and will retain ownership for now. 

If the City sells or disposes of the abandoned roadway in the future, A.R.S. Section 28-7208 requires the City to receive consideration in an amount deemed commensurate with the value for the abandoned roadway.  The City may exchange the abandoned roadway for real property of substantially equal value pursuant to A.R.S. Section 9-407.
Policy Impact:
None.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Livable Community - Provide amenities and activities that support a healthy lifestyle. 

Regional Plan
Goal T.1. Improve mobility and access throughout the region.
Goal T.2. Improve transportation safety and efficiency for all modes.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
None.

The Council has previously approved an abandonment of undeveloped right-of-way on the north side of Hoskins Avenue. On May 18, 2021 the City Council adopted Ordinance No. 2021-28, abandoning approximately 1,400 square feet of Hoskins Avenue at the northwest corner of Leroux Street, and authorizing sale of the property for its estimated value as the minimum bid.  The adjacent property owner purchased that land.  
Options and Alternatives:
1. Approve ordinance abandoning 5,237 square feet of right-of-way;
2. Do not approve ordinance and provide further direction to staff.
Background/History:
In 1943 the Revised Plat of the Washington Addition of the City of Flagstaff, dedicated Hoskins Street to the public for public use in varying widths from 60' to 73.5'. The right of way in question is directly south of Lot 27. Connecting this portion of right of way as a street, west into NAU Campus never occurred due to topography the campus development pattern.

The 2018 Survey of Block A, Revised Washington Addition identifies the width of Hoskins Street South of Lot 27 (631 S. Fountaine Street) as 68.4 feet. This right-of-way has never been developed for public use and the adjacent property owner has been using the right-of-way as a driveway or for parking.

NAU approached the City with a request to abandon a portion of the unbuilt remnant of Hoskins right-of-way adjacent to 631 S. Fountaine Street. The City Planners, Engineers, Water Services and Traffic evaluated that certain remnant right-of-way along the south side of 631 S. Fountaine Street and determined that right-of-way is no longer needed for use as roadway, except that the southern 20’ does need to remain as roadway for existing and future uses. 

The City contacted utility companies on October 4 and October 17, 2022 requesting utility clearances for the proposed abandonment.  As a condition of abandonment of public right-of -way (ROW), the City will need to allow the existing utility facilities to remain in place or provide for relocation. 
APS Response: Approve abandonment without conditions
UniSource Response: No facilities within portion of ROW
CenturyLink Response: Has not completed review. (If there are facilities in ROW, City will reserve an easement for them).
City Utilities Response: Utility needs are preserved with retained portion of ROW

Attachments: Ord. 2022-31
Hoskins Ave legal description
Presentation
City Code abandonment
 
9.C.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: David Pedersen, Capital Improvements Project Manager
Date: 11/18/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Approval of Contract:  Construction Manager at Risk Construction Services Agreement with Eagle Mountain Construction, Inc. for the Beulah/University Roadway Project.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
  1. Approve the Construction Manager at Risk Construction Services Agreement with Eagle Mountain Construction for a Guaranteed Maximum Price of $19,010,333.00 and a contract duration of 850 calendar days; 
  2. Approve an Owner’s Contingency of $299,000.00, which is 1.55% of the Guaranteed Maximum Price; and
  3. Authorize the City Manager to execute the necessary documents.
Executive Summary:
Staff recommends approval of a Construction Manager at Risk (CMAR) Construction Services Agreement (Agreement) for a Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) of $19,010,333.00 with a Total Contract Price of $19,309,333 to Eagle Mountain Construction (EMC) which will authorize the construction of the Beulah/University Realignment Project (Project).
 
This roadway improvement realignment Project extends the northern terminus of Beulah Boulevard to connect with University Avenue. Furthermore, University Avenue (west of Milton) will be realigned to match up with University Drive (east of Milton). A new roundabout will be constructed where Beulah Boulevard and University Avenue will intersect. Additionally, this Project will also be constructing a new pedestrian underpass beneath Milton Road, just south of Burger King across to Target. Moreover, the Project will also include underground water, sewer, and stormwater infrastructure, several new sections of sidewalks and shared-use paths, as well as landscaping and hardscape throughout the extent of the Project. Please refer to the attached context and vicinity maps.   
 
Pending the City Council’s approval, construction is anticipated to begin in spring 2023 and continue into summer 2025. The 850-calendar day duration will cover the continuous, two phases, of construction through three construction seasons.
Financial Impact:
In May 2000, the City of Flagstaff voters approved Proposition 403 which provided funding for improvements to Traffic Flow and Safety. As part of this proposition, two of those projects relate to the Project. These two projects were the University Avenue Realignment and Beulah Boulevard Extension.
 
City Staff completed a preliminary realignment plan and programmed $7.4 million in the FY2015 Capital Improvement Program Summary. Now in FY2023, the authorized spending budget is $22,139,900.00 which was funded with a combination of old and new transportation taxes and developer contributions.
 
As part of the internal FY2023 budget process, the team reported in January 2022 a request for additional funds to cover the expenses reported with the GMP of $17.3M by EMC. The discussion with Finance continued in April when Finance Staff was able to identify an approximate $800K coming from the balance of the Fourth Street Reconstruction Project as well as an approximate $3.6M from potential carry forwards from Proposition 419 projects in FY2023. This was based on the estimated budget expenditures for projects identified that may not be completed or are anticipated to be pushed to FY2024. The total proposed budget for FY 2023 would be $22.1M with a contribution of $1.65M from Vintage Partners, LLC (VP). It should be noted that VP is responsible for all costs associated with the pedestrian underpass and per Amendment One to the Development Agreement (DA), those costs must be repaid to the City within five (5) years. This payment has been referred to at the true-up payment. 
 
As the Project has undergone design, the estimate of construction has increased. When EMC joined the team last fall, the Project estimating transferred from Shephard-Wesnitzer, Inc. (SWI) to EMC, or from designer to contractor. As mentioned earlier, this allows for a more inclusive estimate by those who will be constructing the Project and are familiar with current costs and availability. When EMC provided the team an estimate in mid-January 2022 the construction cost estimate was $17.3M. Upon greater refinement of the design, that figure grew to $18.5M in the beginning of March 2022 and when the 90-percent plans were completed in the end of April 2022, the construction costs were up to $19.1M. At that time in April, the estimating was put on hold until the design plans were finalized, and a value engineering effort could be completed. In the late October/early November timeframe, the value engineering was ended and resulted in a project savings of $668,790, without reducing the project scope. While facing inflation and the rising costs of materials, supplies, and operations, the team was able to finalize the GMP at $19,309,333.
Policy Impact:
No impact.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure
Utilize existing long-range plan(s) that identify the community's future infrastructure needs and all associated costs
 
Council Goal 2017 – 2019 - Transportation and Other Public Infrastructure
Deliver quality community assets and continue to advocate and implement a highly performing multi-modal transportation system.
 
Council Goal 2017 – 2019 - Environmental and Natural Resources
Actively manage and protect all environmental and natural resources

Team Flagstaff Strategic Plan – Priority 3
Deliver outstanding services through a healthy environment, resources, and infrastructure.

Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Livable CommunityProvide amenities & activities that support a healthy lifestyle
Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure - Provide effective management of and infrastructure for all modes of transportation
Safe & Healthy Community - Promote physical health through providing recreation opportunities, parks, open space & multiple transportation options

Carbon Neutrality Plan
DD-2: Create inclusive networks for walking and biking that are continuous, attractive, safe, comprehensive, and  convenient for people of all ages.
DD-3: Encourage Flagstaff residents and visitors to walk, bike, roll and take the bus.

Regional Plan
Policy CC.4.1. Design streetscapes to be context sensitive and transportation systems to reflect the desired land use while balancing the needs of all modes for traffic safety and construction and maintenance costs.
Policy CC.4.4. Design streets and parking lots to balance automobile facilities, recognize human-scale and pedestrian needs, and accentuate the surrounding environment.
Policy CC.4.5. Encourage local landscaping using Xeriscape, low-impact principles, and native vegetation wherever possible.
Policy T.1.1. Integrate a balanced, multimodal, regional transportation system.
Policy T.1.4. Provide a continuous transportation system with convenient transfer from one mode to another.
Policy T.1.6. Provide and promote strategies that increase alternate modes of travel and demand for vehicular travel to reduce peak period traffic.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
The Beulah/University Realignment Project has been before City Council numerous times in the past twenty years. Some of these meetings are shown below:
 
In 2005, the City purchased the 9.23-acre Fresquez property for the purpose of completing the University and Beulah roadway improvements.

On December 2, 2014, the City Council approved the P3 Pre-development Agreement between the City of Flagstaff, Arizona Department of Transportation and Vintage Partners, LLC, which is included with this staff summary. (Initial Agreement for the extension of Beulah Boulevard, realignment of University Avenue, and relocation of ADOT facilities). 
 
On August 21, 2017, the City Council approved the Reinstatement of, and First Amendment to the P3 Pre-Development Agreement extending the term.

On March 20, 2018, the City Council approved the Third Amendment to P3 Pre-Development Agreement between the City of Flagstaff, Arizona Department of Transportation, and VP.
 
On April 17, 2018, the City Council adopted a resolution (No. 2018-13) authorizing the execution of the Mill Town Development Agreement between VP and the City (Mill Town Development Agreement)
 
On June 29, 2021, where the 60% design plans were discussed.

On October 19, 2021, the City Council adopted a resolution (No. 2021-44) authorizing the execution of the First Amendment to the Mill Town Development Agreement between VP and the City.

On June 14, 2022, a City Council Report (CCR) was issued to update the City Council on the Project.
Options and Alternatives:
  1. Approve the award as recommended. Approval will allow work to move forward; or,
  2. Reject approval of the award as recommended. This action would delay the Project
    1. If rejection occurs, possible options include:
      1. Ask staff to re-evaluate the recommendation; or
      2. Suspend or cancel the Project completely.
Background/History:
The Beulah/University Roadway Realignment Project (Project) extends the present-day northern terminus of Beulah Boulevard to connect with University Avenue. Furthermore, University Avenue (west of Milton Road) will be realigned to match up with University Drive (east of Milton Road) via a new roundabout where Beulah Boulevard and University Avenue intersect, on the former Fresquez parcel. Additionally, this Project will also be constructing a new pedestrian underpass beneath Milton Road, just south of Burger King across to Target. Moreover, the Project will also include underground water, sewer, and stormwater infrastructure, several new sections of sidewalks and shared-use paths, as well as landscaping and hardscape throughout the extent of the Project.  

The engineering design of this Project began in June 2018 by Shephard-Wesnitzer, Inc. (SWI). The 60-percent design plans were presented to City Council on 29 June 2021 at which time City Council directed staff to modify the design with a focus on bike and pedestrian components. The modified design was presented to City Council on 5 October 2021. Since this time the plans are nearly finalized, with the only modifications being incorporating the value engineering items.
 
On 24 September 2021, the City procured EMC as the CMAR for the Project. Since then, EMC has been able to assist the design team from the construction contractor perspective. By bringing EMC on board during the design process, they were able speak to constructability, phasing, availability of materials, and construction costs which helps to bring greater accuracy to Project timelines and budget. 
 
The team conducted several value engineering workshops and meetings in the fall of 2022, which resulted in significant Project savings, without reducing the scope of the Project. These savings are reflected in the GMP being presented on December 6, 2022.
Community Benefits and Considerations:
  • New bike/pedestrian underpass under Milton Road
  • New roadways and bike/ped-friendly roundabout and shared-use paths with greater connectivity to existing roadways and paths
  • Realigning University Avenue (west of Milton) with University Drive (east of Milton)
  • Replacing aged and undersized existing water and sewer infrastructure
  • Improving intersection safety by reconfiguring the roadway geometry and removing surface crossings of Milton Road
  • Streetlighting being brought up to City dark skies and engineering standards
  • Improved roadway drainage throughout the extent of the Project
  • Coordinating and communicating with Project stakeholders to reduce impact to businesses, NAU, community members, and visitors to our community
Community Involvement:
Inform, Involve, Empower:
  • In May 2000, voters approved a dedicated sales tax increase to fund various road improvements including the Beulah/University Realignment Project.
  • In November 2018, voters approved the new transportation tax.  
  • NAU, Mountain Line, ADOT, and the City’s P3 Partner Vintage Partners have been actively involved in the design and development of this Project.
  • Design Team has met in the field, in meetings, and over the phone with impacted businesses, residents, and stakeholders.
  • Beta PR will be part of the construction phase of this project to aid with project updates, outreach, and overall communication with our community.
  • Other Project Stakeholders including ADOT, NAU, and Mountain Line were notified of the upcoming Project and were coordinated with on the traffic control and phasing plans during construction.
Expanded Options and Alternatives:
  1. Approve the award as recommended. Approval will allow work to move forward; or,
  2. Reject approval of the award as recommended. This action would delay the Project
    1. If rejection occurs, possible options include:
      1. Ask staff to re-evaluate the recommendation; or
      2. Suspend or cancel the Project completely.

Attachments: Agreement
CMAR Agreement - Exhibit B GMP
Project Exhibit
BU Context Map
 
10.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Tiffany Antol, Senior Planner
Date: 11/08/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Resolution No. 2022-56: A Resolution of the Flagstaff City Council amending the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 to change the place type designation within a future suburban activity center (S16) from neighborhood scale to regional scale on Maps 21, 22, and 24; move the center point of a future suburban activity center (S16) north and east on Maps 21, 22, and 24; change the area type designation on Map 21 and 22 from Area in White and existing Rural/Future Suburban to Existing Employment for approximately 28 acres; and realign a future circulation road corridor on Map 25 generally located at 1120 W Purple Sage Trail; providing for severability, and establishing an effective date.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
1) Read Resolution No. 2022-56 by title only
2) City Clerk reads Resolution No. 2022-56 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Resolution No. 2022-56
Executive Summary:
A Minor Amendment to the Flagstaff Regional Plan requested by Northern Arizona Healthcare (NAH) Corporation to change the place type designation within a future suburban activity center (S16) from neighborhood scale to regional scale on Maps 21, 22, and 24; move the center point of a future suburban activity center (S16) north and east on Maps 21, 22, and 24; change the area type designation on Map 21 and 22 from Area in White and Existing Rural/Future Suburban to Existing Employment for approximately 28 acres; and realign a future circulation road corridor on Map 25 on property located 1120 W. Purple Sage Trail.  The Planning & Zoning Commission held a public hearing on this item on November 9, 2022, and voted unanimously (7-0) to recommend approval.
Financial Impact:
There are no anticipated financial impacts from this Minor Regional Plan Amendment.  Financial impacts will be analyzed as part of the Specific Plan and Zoning Map Amendment that are required to allow the proposed development at this location.
Policy Impact:
There are no anticipated policy impacts from this Minor Regional Plan Amendment.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Support diverse employment opportunities that provide residents with a living wage.
Support social services, community partners and housing opportunities.
 
Carbon Neutrality Plan
Ensure all mitigation actions improve Flagstaff's ability to adapt to the future.

Regional Plan
Applicable to all Land Uses Goals and Policies
Goal LU.3. Continue to enhance the region’s unique sense of place within the urban, suburban, and rural context.
Policy LU.3.1. Within the urban, suburban, and rural context, use neighborhoods, activity centers, corridors, public spaces, and connectivity as the structural framework for development.
Policy LUR.3.4 Promote transitions between the urban, suburban, and rural areas with an appropriate change in development intensity, connectivity, and open space.
Goal LU.4. Balance housing and employment land uses with the preservation and protection of our unique natural and cultural setting.
Policy LU.4.1. Develop neighborhood plans, specific plans, area plans, and master plans for all neighborhoods, activity centers, corridors, and gateways as necessary.
 
Goal LU.5. Encourage compact development principles to achieve efficiencies and open space preservation.
Policy LU.5.5. Plan for and promote compact commercial development as activity centers with mixed uses, allowing for efficient multi-modal transit options and infrastructure.
Policy LU..5 Encourage the distribution of density within neighborhoods in relationship to associated activity centers and corridors, infrastructure, transportation, and natural constraints such as slopes and drainages.
Policy LU.5.6. Encourage the placement of institutional and civic buildings centrally within a neighborhood to promote walkability and multi-use recreation spaces.
                       
Suburban Area Goals and Policies
Goal LU.13. Increase the variety of housing options and expand opportunities for employment and neighborhood shopping within all suburban neighborhoods.
        Policy LU.13.7. Include employment opportunities in all suburban activity centers.
        Policy LU.13.8. Locate civic spaces, parks, and institutional uses within neighborhood pedestrian sheds.
 
Employment Area Goals and Policies
Goal LU.15. Plan for and encourage employee-intensive uses throughout the area as activity centers, corridors, research and development offices, business parks, and light industrial areas to encourage efficient infrastructure and multimodal commuting.
Policy LU.15.1. Encourage the grouping of medical and professional offices, light industrial, research, and skill training, and skill training with other necessary workforce services and transportation options.
Policy LU.15.2. Consider the compatible integration of residential uses and proposed employment centers to reduce vehicle trips and commute times.
 
Activity Centers and Commercial Corridors Goals and Policies
Goal LU.18. Develop well designed activity centers and corridors with a variety of employment, business, shopping, civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and residential choices. 
Policy LU.18.1 Design activity centers and corridors appropriate to and within the context of each area type: urban, suburban, or rural.
Policy LU.18.7. Concentrate commercial, retail, services, and mixed use within the activity center’s commercial core.
Policy LU.18.9. Plan activity centers and corridors appropriate to their respective regional or neighborhood scale.
Policy LU.18.12.  Corridors should focus commercial development to the corridor frontage and residential to the back.
Policy LU.18.15. Actual pedestrian-shed boundaries will be established considering opportunities and constraints posed by natural and man-made barriers like terrain or the interstate, road networks, and existing development patterns.
Policy LU.18.19. New development in future activity centers should create street patterns that implement the characteristics of urban and suburban place-making with a functional transportation system that minimized dead ends and offset street and driveway connections.
 
Mobility and Access Goals and Policies
Goal T.1. Improve mobility and access throughout the region.
Policy T.1.1. Integrate a balanced, multimodal, regional transportation system.
Policy T.1.3. Transportation systems are consistent with the place type and needs of people
Policy T.1.5. Manage the operation and interaction of all modal systems for efficiency, effectiveness, safety, and to best mitigate traffic congestion.
 
Safe and Efficient Multimodal Transportation Goals and Policies
Goal T.2. Improve transportation safety and efficiency for all modes.
Policy T.2.2 Design infrastructure to provide safe and efficient movement of vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians.
 
Quality Design Goals and Policies
Goal T.4. Promote transportation infrastructure and services that enhance the quality of life of the communities within the region.
Policy T.4.1. Promote context sensitive solutions (CSS) supportive of planned land uses, integration of related infrastructure needs, and desired community character elements in all transportation investments.
 
Automobile Goals and Policies
Goal T.8. Establish a functional, safe, and aesthetic hierarchy of roads and streets.
Policy T.8.1. Promote efficient transportation connectivity to major trade corridors, employment centers, and special districts that enhances the region’s standing as major economic hub.
Policy T. 8.2.  Maintain the road and street classification system that is based on context, function, type, use, and visual quality.
           Policy T.8.4 Protect rights-of-way for future transportation corridors.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
There have been no previous Council decisions on this item.
Options and Alternatives:
The City Council may approve the resolution as proposed, approve the resolution with conditions, or deny the resolution.
Background/History:
The applicant, NAH, is requesting a Minor Regional Plan Amendment to support the future rezoning of approximately 172.6 acres to accommodate a new regional hospital and ambulatory care facility, surrounded by a Health Village designed as a location for a full range of medical, health, and wellness services mixed with supporting commercial, retail, research and development, general services, and housing uses. This new regional hospital is intended to replace the existing Flagstaff Medical Center (FMC) that has been operating in Flagstaff since 1936.NAH has owned and operated FMC for the past 35 years. FMC currently maintains a 300-bed patient facility and is an Arizona-certified Level 1 Trauma Center.FMC is the only Arizona Level 1 Trauma Center north of Phoenix. This Minor Regional Plan Amendment is intended to be followed by a Specific Plan for the 172.6 acres. The Specific Plan will serve as a planning framework for development of the overall Health Village with goals and policies and analysis of impacts to public services. In addition, the plan will also serve a regulatory function by establishing specific development standards for parcels within the Planning Area.
 
FMC’s current campus consists of 40 acres of land that is divided by a primary transportation route (Beaver Street). NAH has struggled to maintain efficiencies on the existing site due to physical constraints and has worked continuously over the years on the existing site to enhance services to the Community. While NAH owns additional undeveloped land in the immediate vicinity of the existing hospital those parcels are not contiguous and new development on those lots is likely to exacerbate existing issues with the current development. NAH has decided to pursue a new greenfield development to provide more efficient medical services as well as expand service offerings. In addition to the hospital, NAH has opted to plan for a larger development with supporting uses on an overall 172.6-acre site known as a “Health Village”. These supporting uses include complementary retail, commercial, research, education, and residential units. The anchor of the Health Village will be a new regional hospital with up to 486-beds, outpatient care including surgical services, and medical and administrative offices.Open space and civic space are also incorporated to support the Health Village concept.
 
The existing 172.6 acres of land is bounded by Beulah Boulevard (an existing 2-lane arterial roadway) to the east and is partially bisected by Purple Sage Trail which is a private roadway easement that has been improved with asphalt millings.  Purple Sage provides access to Fort Tuthill County Park as well as the surrounding residential properties. The Healthcare Village proposes a new circulation system for the planning area including a new arterial roadway (Healthcare Boulevard) that will eventually connect with Woody Mountain Road and two new collector roads (Purple Sage and Wellness Loop). Other internal roadways will be phased as development occurs withing the Planning Area.  Development in the Planning Area is intended to be phased with the hospital and affiliated medical uses identified as the priority.  Most of the required on-site infrastructure improvements are triggered by this first phase of development. 
Key Considerations:
As discussed in the “How This Plan Works” chapter (page III-4), the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 is used in the regulatory decision-making process by the Planning & Zoning Commission, City Council, and City staff.  The Commission and the Council are responsible for making development decisions such as zoning map amendments or specific plans, which depends on whether the proposed changes or projects are consistent with the Plan’s goals and policies.  The Future Growth Illustration on Maps 21 and 22 (same map; one is regional scale and one city scale) and the text of the Plan will provide supplemental information for the interpretation of goals and policies.  In case of any conflict between the Future Growth Illustration and the Plan’s goals and policies, the goals and policies will prevail. 
 
The Future Growth Illustration has two types of land use designations: “Area Types” describe the placemaking context of Urban, Suburban, Rural, or Employment and “Place Types” such as activity centers, corridors, and neighborhoods provide the framework for the density, intensities, and mix of uses within the area types.  This application proposes to change the place type of a Future Suburban Activity Center (S16) from neighborhood scale to regional scale and to relocate the center point of the same activity center over the project site (Maps 21, 22, - Future Growth Illustration and Map 24 – Activity Centers).  Activity Centers are mixed-use areas where there is a concentration of commercial and other land uses typically defined by a pedestrian shed. A Suburban Activity Center can serve a Regional scale or Neighborhood scale.  The activity center for this site (S16) is currently identified as neighborhood scale. Neighborhood Suburban Activity Centers are intended to be smaller, mixed-use centers at intersections of collector streets and neighborhood access roads providing connections to local goods and services, public spaces, transit, and the FUTS.  Regional Suburban Activity Centers are larger, mixed-use centers at intersections of arterial roads and collector streets, with access to large residential developments including entertainment and cultural amenities, public spaces, and transit with an emphasis on both residents and visitors. Large-scale high occupancy housing and transit-oriented development is appropriate in this scale of activity center.
 
In addition, this application proposes to change the area type of “Areas in white retain their existing entitlements” and Existing Rural/Future Suburban to “Employment” over approximately 28 acres.  “Areas in white retain their existing entitlements” is used to describe areas that have not been assigned an area type.  In most cases, these unassigned areas are public lands held by the Forest Service, Arizona State Land Department, or City of Flagstaff.  In this case, they are privately owned land located adjacent to land owned by Coconino County operated as a regional park (Fort Tuthill). The Comprehensive Planning Manager has made the interpretation that the surrounding area types on Maps 21 and 22 (Future Growth Illustration) should be considered for consistency.  In cases where a parcel is adjacent to more than one area type, either could be extended to the property.  In this case the subject property sits in between areas designated as Future Employment and Suburban to the east, Existing Rural/Future Suburban to the north and Rural and Parks/Open Space to the west.  With this request the existing “Area in White” and some of the Existing Rural/Future Suburban will, if approved, be assigned the Existing Employment area type. 
 
For the area within the site remaining Existing Rural/Future Suburban, future applications for the specific plan and zoning map amendment will be evaluated under the Suburban and Regional Activity Center goals and policies for plan conformance.
 
Lastly, this application proposes to realign a future transportation corridor as identified on Map 25 (Road Network Illustration).  The current Map 25 shows a realignment of the existing Beulah Boulevard from its current location adjacent to Interstate 17 corridor further west along the eastern boundary of Fort Tuthill.  The primary purpose for this realignment was to allow for either an underpass or overpass across I-17 to connect with South Pulliam Drive just before it enters the Ponderosa Trails subdivision.  This crossing of I-17 was originally identified with the proposed development called Villaggio Montana which included a total of 1,020 acres including most of the land in this application.  The crossing of I-17 started out as a new interchange and morphed into an underpass due to existing grades. While Villaggio Montana did not move forward as planned, the underpass remained an element of the future road network and was included in the current Regional Plan as shown on Map 25.   The applicant is proposing to leave Beulah Boulevard in its current alignment adjacent to I-17 to maintain a larger contiguous parcel of land that can accommodate the proposed hospital and future expansions if necessary.
 
Attached are exhibits comparing the existing Regional Plan maps to the proposed Future Growth Illustration map.  These maps and any applicable text of the FRP 2030 should be considered in the context of the Plan’s goals and policies.  A discussion of the FRP 2030 goals and policies is provided below.  There are no goals and policies that reference “Areas in white retain their existing entitlements.” 
Community Benefits and Considerations:
The City Council shall find that the proposed Minor Regional Plan Amendment meets the requirements of the General Plan and Subdivision Code (City Code Title 11).  In considering the request for an amendment to the Plan, the goals and policies should be considered to ensure that the requested change to the Future Growth Illustration is in conformance with the overall vision.  “The Flagstaff Regional Plan establishes the vision for the future growth and development of Flagstaff and its surrounding area through goals and policies” (p.III-4).  “General plans are not static documents; they recognize growth as a dynamic process, which may require revisions to the plan as circumstances or changes warrant” (p.III-1).
 
Regional Plan Vision
“The Greater Flagstaff community embraces the region’s extraordinary cultural and ecological setting on the Colorado Plateau through active stewardship of the natural and built environments.  Residents and visitors encourage and advance intellectual, environmental, social, and economic vitality for today’s citizens and future generations.” (p I-1)
 
An analysis is provided for each of the four requests included in this application.

1. Changing the place type designation of a Future Suburban Activity Center from Neighborhood to Regional.
The Regional Plan located future activity centers where the future road networks intended to intersect, and future development has been proposed (LU.3 and LU.18).  In this case, activity center S16 was located at the future intersection of Beulah Boulevard and Woody Mountain Road (both designated as minor arterials).  This intersection location was the result of planning efforts for the Villaggio Montana residential development considered prior to the adoption of the current Regional Plan.  Every activity center is intended to work at its own scale, serving the needs of the surrounding community.  That scale is directly related to the road types serving the center and surrounding development.  Regional centers are the largest and are generally located at the intersection of major roads and have multiple large residential developments with direct access to it. 
 
In this case, activity S16 was always intended to be located at the intersection of two arterial roadways like a regional scale activity center, however, the existing surrounding development remains at a low density and intensity of development based on existing zoning.  Neighborhood centers are smaller areas that focus commercial and mixed-use development at intersections and within proximity to commercial corridors.  These areas transition quickly to neighborhoods that have easy access to them.  It is clear from previous development plans that this was the original intent. The subject property is shown in the Regional Plan with the desired future infrastructure necessary to serve a regional scale development versus neighborhood scale. 
 
The proposed development of a new regional hospital requires a regional scale activity center to support a zoning map amendment request at this location because the scale, mix of uses and regional attraction of the proposal is more than the original vision for S16 (LU.5 and LU.13).  The Regional Plan goals and policies related to activity centers include support for well-designed centers with a variety of uses, development related to the appropriate context of the area type (urban, suburban, or rural) and that the center and corridor be developed in relation to the regional or neighborhood scale.  The future activity center S16 meets many of the features that relate to regional scale development such as being located at the intersection of arterial roadways.  The relocation of the activity center, discussed further below, aligns the activity within an area type of future suburban as opposed to existing rural. Several existing regional scale activity centers are situated under similar conditions with future or existing suburban being the primary area type within the activity center.
 
There have been no private development requests to amend the scale of a future activity center since the adoption of the Regional Plan.           

2. Moving the center of a Future Suburban Activity Center to the north and east of its existing location.
As discussed above, activity centers were located based on the types of intersections expected to be developed (T.8 and T.1).  In this case, the applicant is requesting to modify the proposed road network shown on Map 25 which will alter the intersection of two arterial roads within this area.  This realignment of the road network supports the relocation of this activity center.  Instead of locating the center of the activity center over an intersection it places priority on the focal point of the proposed Health Village, the hospital and ambulatory surgical center.  There are no specific goals and policies that discuss the relocation of an activity center.  The Regional Plan suggests that specific plans should be developed with activity centers to ensure the activity center achieves the desired outcome based on area and place type (LU.18).  A Specific Plan is being prepared and will be submitted for Planning and Zoning Commission recommendation to the Council following this request to ensure that the activity center meets the parameters of the Regional Plan by providing high level development guidance and development standards.
 
There have been no private development requests to modify a future activity center since the Regional Plan was adopted.  The mix of land use zoning types within designated activity centers has changed little from year to year. Since 2014, the balance of zoning has changed in the following ways: commercial zoning has increased by 50 acres, public open space zoning by 42 acres, residential by 291 acres, and transect zones and increased by 3 acres. Industrial space has decreased by 56 acres. Much of this change has been the result of two Specific plans. The Southside and High Occupancy Housing plans both recalibrated the location of activity centers and their use-mix. Future changes to activity centers are still expected, with current work focusing on interpreting the specific land parcels that are/should be included in activity centers. This work may increase the total land area designated as part of an activity center. The relocation of this activity center has the potential to add approximately 63 acres of commercial space and 35 acres of public space if a zoning map amendment is approved in conjunction with this request.

3. Changing the area type designation from Area in White and Rural/Suburban to Employment for 28 acres.
Approximately 28 acres of the 172.6-acre Property are proposed to have their area type changed to Employment (LU. 4 and LU.15).  Currently, these 28 acres are designated as Area in White retains existing entitlements and Existing Rural/Future Suburban.  The property in this area is currently zoned for and would support large lot single family residential development.  This may not be the highest and best use for a property that is located directly adjacent to a regional park, a minor arterial roadway, and a major interstate.
 
Since the adoption of the Regional Plan there have been twelve minor amendments.  These amendments have primarily focused on increasing the Park/Open Space area type.  There has been only one amendment (in the last year) to date increasing the Employment area type.  There has been one amendment converting approximately 36.5 acres of Employment to the Park/Open Space area type (McMillan Mesa Natural Area).  This proposed amendment would add back approximately 28 acres of Employment area type, which is one of the most protected area types identified in the Plan.  Similarly, approximately 119 acres of land have been rezoned from industrial zones to other zoning categories since 2014.  This request will support an additional 27.8 net acres of land for research and development.
 
The proposed amendment is supported by several goals and policies within the Plan and the proposed location is an ideal candidate for this amendment.  The goals and policies listed above support the location of the proposed uses associated with this application. These conditions support the finding of conformance with the Regional Plan.

4. Realigning a future road corridor (Beulah Boulevard).
As stated above, the Road Network Illustration (Map 25) shows Beulah Boulevard moved west of its current location to accommodate a future underpass across I-17.  This underpass is important for the future transportation network because it will help reduce trips at the airport traffic interchange as well as Lake Mary Road and Beulah Boulevard and will assist with lowering vehicle miles traveled within Flagstaff.  While the applicant is not anticipating constructing this underpass as part of their development, the applicant will need to ensure that leaving Beulah in its current location will not prohibit the future construction of the underpass.  The intersection of Beulah Boulevard and Purple Sage Trail will be conditioned with any subsequent entitlement case to be designed and constructed to accommodate a future underpass across I-17.
Community Involvement:
Inform. Public hearings before the Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council are conducted in conjunction with the Regional Plan Amendment request.  In accordance with Arizona Revised Statute and Section 10-20.30.080 (p. 20.30-9) of the Zoning Code, notice of the public hearings were provided by placing an ad in the Arizona Daily Sun, posting notices on the property, and mailing a notice to all property owners and homeowner’s associations within one half of the subject property, consisting of 900 property owners.
 
The applicant held three neighborhood meetings for this application in addition to a proposed Specific Plan and Concept Zoning Map Amendment.  These meetings were held on January 6, and January 18, 2022, at 5:30 pm and October 10, 2022, at 6:00 pm via Zoom.  The January 6, 2022, meeting had approximately 70 attendees and the January 18, 2022, meeting had approximately 100 attendees.  The October 10, 2022, meeting had approximately 154 attendees. Common themes of support included economic development impacts, better access to care and new clinical services and the overall health and wellness vision.   Common themes of concern included transit and bus service, access to the new campus, traffic, re-use of the existing NAH campus, helicopter/ambulance noise, and building height.  The public participation plan for all NAH applications can be found at this link https://awdlaw267.sharefile.com/d-sd088fa2cf1c74f29a82320c743fe1caa.

Attachments: Application
Planning Commission Staff Report
Project Narrative
Applicant's Regional Plan Analysis
Res. 2022-56
Exhibit A to Resolution No. 2022-56
Exhibit B to Resolution No. 2022-56
Exhibit C to Resolution No. 2022-56
Presentation
Emails to the Planning & Zoning Commission
 
11.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Meg Roederer, Communications Specialist
Date: 11/15/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Resolution No. 2022-57:  A resolution naming the Milligan House at the Discover Flagstaff Convention and Visitors Bureau administration facility the "Debbi L. Grogan Memorial CVB Conference Room."
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
1) Read Resolution No. 2022-57 by title only
2) City Clerk reads Resolution No. 2022-57 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Resolution No. 2022-57
Executive Summary:
Thursday, December 20, 2018, Debbi L. Grogan, beloved wife, mother, daughter, and sister, passed away from complications of pancreatic cancer. Debbi served as Tourism Commission Chair and was a pillar in the Flagstaff community. Her passion and commitment helped create a stronger business community, a more progressive approach to planning, and her famous festivals have brought worldwide attention – Flagstaff Blues & Brews and the Flagstaff Oktoberfest. The community of Flagstaff is a better place because of the efforts and dedication of Debbi Grogan.

The proposed naming of the Milligan House Discover Flagstaff CVB conference room would be in her honor as a tribute to her service as the former Tourism Commission Chair, support of the Flagstaff community, and advocate of the tourism industry.

According to the City of Flagstaff policy (Res. No. 2001-73), the proposed name acknowledges significant non-monetary support received from either an individual or an organization that contributed in a definitive way to the betterment of the Flagstaff community and its citizens. The individual or organization must be accepted by the general public and/or the related professional field as a local, state, or national hero/contributor, or has had historical significance. If the proposed name is that of an individual, the person must have been deceased for two years. 

On July 26, 2022, Tourism Commissioner Fleischer made a formal motion to approve the conference room name change and Commissioner Jimenez seconded the motion. The motion was approved unanimously.

Below are suggested room names.
a. Debbi L. Grogan Memorial Room
b. Debbi L. Grogan Memorial Conference Room
c. Debbi L. Grogan Memorial CVB Conference Room

A memo and related documents were then presented to the City Manager regarding the naming request. There was a public comment period for community input via the Discover Flagstaff database email communication from September 13-October 18, 2022. On November 22, 2022 the Tourism Commission unanimously approved the motion to formally forward the naming request to City Council for consideration and Resolution adoption.
Financial Impact:
A wall plaque will be purchased for approximately $400 or less and installed at the CVB conference room with budgeted funds from the CVB office supplies account 053-07-214-0850-4-4342. 
Policy Impact:
None
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
no direct connection

Carbon Neutrality Plan
no direct connection

Regional Plan
no direct connection 
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
No 

Attachments: Res. 2022-57
 
11.B.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Amy Hagin, Assistant Parks and Recreation Director
Date: 11/15/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption: Thorpe Park Annex Concept
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Adopt the concept for Thorpe Park Annex as currently designed.
Executive Summary:
Based on direction provided by Council on October 25, the team worked with Wheat Design to update the concept, which was discussed with Council on November 15, 2022. The final concept for adoption incorporates the direction received from Council during those two discussions. 

This concept design is high-level design work to provide the framework for how this plan will be expressed visually giving purpose to the features of the design.  The features expressed in the concept design include the Indigenous Community Cultural Center (ICCC) with surroundings that complement and restore the area including native re-vegetation, a traditional ceremonial space, an orchard, community gardening space, a relocated bark park, pickleball courts in an area of the regional park with other active recreation (outside of the Thorpe Park Annex space), a combined skate park/pump track, and ethno-botanical pollinator gardens.  Lastly, city employee housing is conceptual on the design pending discussions with both Arizona State Parks and the National Park Service regarding previous Land and Water Conservation Fund regarding feasibility.  
Financial Impact:
The concept will eventually need to be funded for formal design and construction. Staff anticipates the need to fund and deliver the project in phases. After Council adoption of the concept, staff will work with the Parks and Recreation Commission to prioritize all project needs for funding, including this project, and will be discussed during each budget cycle. Staff will also seek grant opportunities and partnerships.
Policy Impact:
Potential policy changes may be needed in the future, pending any ordinance or zoning changes, or grant funded project area requirements by Arizona State Parks and the National Park Service regarding previous Land and Water Conservation Fund grant project requirements.
Connection to PBB Key Community Priorities/Objectives & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Provide amenities and activities that support a healthy lifestyle
Carbon Neutrality Plan
ES-2:   Proactively engage community members on an ongoing basis.
Regional Plan
Goal E&C.6. Protect, restore and improve ecosystem health and maintain native plant and animal community diversity across all land ownerships in the Flagstaff region.
Previous Council Decision on This:
This has been an iterative process, including discussions with City Council on February 4, 2020; October 25, 2022, and November 15, 2022. Direction from Council at each of these meetings has guided the process to the final concept being discussed at this meeting for adoption.
Options and Alternatives:
Adopt the final concept as presented or request additional changes. 
Background/History:
After a year-long community engagement process, several iterations of draft concepts have gone through community and Council review and input. The final version presented here incorporates Council requested changes from October 25 and November 15, 2022.
Key Considerations:
Adoption of this concept will provide staff with direction on how to redevelop the old Public Works Yard and reincorporate the area into the City's largest regional park, Thorpe Park.
Community Involvement:
The public engagement facilitation endeavored for an inclusive and accessible process through focus groups, surveys, virtual meetings, and in-person design meetings on the site.  Public engagement such as written elements and having an opportunity to build the park with tangible pieces, as well as verbal sessions were held to ensure desired participation was captured. Groups such as the City’s Indigenous Commission, the Parks and Recreation Commission, and the Indigenous Circle of Flagstaff, along with all current Parks and Recreation user groups were briefed and invited to participate, and the core team consisted of the City's Coordinator of Indigenous Initiatives, the City's Historic Preservation Officer, Parks and Recreation staff, Southwest Decision Resources as the main consultant, and Wheat Design as the landscape architect. Each step of the process built on the previous one creating a foundation where many community members were engaged throughout the year-long process.

Attachments: Concept Design
 
11.C.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Gary Miller, Water Services Engineering Section Director
Co-Submitter: Anja Wendel
Date: 11/03/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-33: an Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Flagstaff, amending the Flagstaff City Code Title 7, Health and Sanitation, Chapter 7-08, Extension and Reimbursement Agreements for the Construction of Water and Sewer Line, and Title 13, Engineering Design Standards and Specification for New Infrastructure, Chapter 13-09 Water, Sewer, and Other Underground Utilities, by amending the Reimbursement Agreement provisions to allow a longer maximum payback period; repeal of conflicting ordinances, severability, authority for clerical corrections, and establishing an effective date.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
At the December 6, 2022 Council Meeting:
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only for the first time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only (if approved above)
At the December 20, 2022 Council Meeting:
3) Read Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only for the final time
4) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-33 by title only (if approved above)
5) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-33
Executive Summary:
This ordinance, to revise city code, is proposed with the intent to improve the existing policies on reimbursement agreements, sometimes referred to as recapture agreements.  Reimbursement agreements are a tool primarily utilized by developers to share the financial cost of extending water and sewer mains to areas of town that are not currently served by this infrastructure.

In 1994 the City adopted a recapture ordinance to provide a process whereby developer can recover a portion of the infrastructure costs from property owners or future developments that will benefit from the new  infrastructure.  Any property owner applying for a connection to a water or sewer main, who did not share in the original cost of installation, will be assessed a proportionate share of the cost, that will then be refunded to the developer who paid the initial capital cost. If adjacent landowners choose not to develop or connect to the utility line, they are not assessed a charge.

In 2007 a revision to this code was adopted simplifying the process by which reimbursement agreements processed and administered.  Since this last revision very few, if any, reimbursement agreements have been done.  The proposed revision would extend the maximum payback period from ten (10) years to twenty (20) years.  This change may encourage investment in water and sewer infrastructure and development.  Most cities in Arizona have recapture ordinances, some allow for a ten-year reimbursement period, and some allow for a twenty-year reimbursement period. 
Financial Impact:
When a reimbursement agreement is established the beneficiary is responsible to pay an established fee, which is a percentage of the total reimbursement, not to exceed $10,000.  This fee is intended to cover the City's cost to administer the agreement.  By extending the payback period the City's obligation to administer will also be extended.  No direct budget impact is expected from this change.
Policy Impact:
The intended and expected policy impact would be in the support of development in areas of the City that are not currently served by water and sewer.  Reimbursement agreements would be a better and more beneficial tool for developers when considering development in these areas.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Priority Based Budget Key Community Priorities and Objectives
Sustainable, Innovative Infrastructure
  • Deliver Outstanding services to residents through a healthy, well maintained infrastructure system
  • Utilize existing long-range plan(s) that identify the community's future infrastructure needs and all associated costs
Livable Community
  • Support the development of attainable and accessible housing

Carbon Neutrality Plan
CR-1:  Ensure all mitigation actions improve Flagstaff's ability to adapt to the future.

Regional Plan
WR.2.2. Maintain and develop facilities to provide reliable, safe, and cost-effective water, wastewater, and reclaimed water services.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
In March of 2020 the City of Flagstaff entered into an agreement with Coconino County entitled "AMENDED AND RESTATED PERMANENT EASEMENT FOR WELLS, DRAINAGE, SEWER, AND WATER PIPELINES (Fort Tuthill)".  Within this agreement the City agreed that "The City Council at a public meeting will consider amending the code to allow a recapture period of up to 20 years."  The County has since completed the sewer main extension contemplated in this agreement and is currently working with staff to establish their reimbursement agreement.  At this time Coconino County is intending to take advantage of the extended payback period proposed in this ordinance.

Attachments: Ord. 2022-33
 
11.D.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Jenny Niemann, Climate Program Manager
Date: 11/15/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Resolution No. 2022-59:  A resolution of the Flagstaff City Council, adopting the 2022 revisions to the Flagstaff Carbon Neutrality Plan
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
1) Read Resolution No. 2022-59 by title only
2) City Clerk reads Resolution No. 2022-59 by title only (if approved above)
3) Adopt Resolution No. 2022-59
Executive Summary:
In response to community appeals, in June 2020, the Flagstaff City Council unanimously adopted Resolution 2020-09 endorsing a Declaration of a Climate Emergency for the City of Flagstaff, committing the City to carbon neutrality by 2030. In response to the Climate Emergency Declaration, staff developed the Flagstaff Carbon Neutrality Plan (CNP).
 
The Flagstaff City Council adopted the Flagstaff Carbon Neutrality Plan on June 15, 2021 (Resolution No. 2021-34). The CNP establishes a vision for how the Flagstaff community will create a carbon-neutral future. Achieving this goal will require reducing greenhouse gas emissions through drastic shifts in how we heat and power our buildings, travel from place to place, and manage our waste. These shifts must occur at multiple levels within the community, as well as across the state, the country, and the world.  
 
The CNP will be revised on an annual basis, in accordance with the CNP implementation plan. The 2022 revisions focus on three areas:
  • Incorporation of new critical information
  • Annual update to the greenhouse gas inventory
  • Consolidation of the 2018 Climate Action and Adaptation Plan (CAAP) and the 2021 Carbon Neutrality Plan (CNP)
The staff presentation will provide a high-level review of the revisions.

INFORMATION:
The CNP now includes four priorities for action and 15 target areas
  • Neighborhoods
    • Community Resilience
    • Equitable Systems
    • Decreased Dependence on Cars
    • Housing for All – from the 10-year Housing Plan
    • Inclusive Recreation – from the CAAP.
  • Energy
    • Electric Mobility
    • Clean Electricity
    • Building Fuel Switching
  • Consumption
    • Reduced Building Energy Use
    • Sustainable Consumption
    • Water Security – from the CAAP.
  • Commitments
    • Healthy Forests and Open Spaces – from the CAAP.
    • Economic Prosperity – from the CAAP.
    • Health and Safety – from the CAAP.
    • Carbon Dioxide Removal
The attached documents include detailed information on the revisions to the Carbon Neutrality Plan, including:
  • A final Plan for consideration of adoption.
  • A copy of the Plan with revisions tracked.
  • A spreadsheet summarizing all tracked changes.
Financial Impact:
Staff does not anticipate a financial impact from this revision to the Carbon Neutrality Plan, as the largest revisions involve the consolidation of two Council-adopted policy documents. The revised Plan will include new information on the total community investment required to achieve the City’s climate goals, which was presented to the City Council on May 10, 2022.
Policy Impact:
The plan revisions do not present significant policy changes, from the two previously adopted policy documents - the 2021 Carbon Neutrality Plan and the 2018 Climate Action and Adaptation Plan.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Connection to Council Goal and/or Regional Plan:
Regional Plan:
  • Goal E&C.2 - Achieve carbon neutrality for the Flagstaff community by 2030.
  • Goal E&C.3 - Prepare Flagstaff’s community systems and resources to be more resilient to climate change impacts, and address climate change in a manner that prioritizes those most impacted and ensures the costs and benefits of climate adaptation and mitigation are equitably distributed.
    • Policy E&C.3.2. Review and revise existing regulations, standards, and plans (codes, ordinances, etc.) to reduce the community’s vulnerability to climate change impacts and reduce the disproportionate impacts on vulnerable communities.
    • Policy E&C.3.5. Improve the ability of vulnerable community members to adapt and thrive amidst the pressures of climate change.
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
Yes. The Carbon Neutrality Plan was adopted in June 2021, following the declaration of the Climate Emergency in June 2020.
The 10 Year Housing Plan was adopted in February 2022, following the declaration of a Housing Emergency in December 2020.
The Active Transportation Master Plan was adopted in November 2022.
Options and Alternatives:
Option A. Adopt Resolution 2022-## as submitted and adopt the revised Plan to guide City staff.
Option B. Recommend changes to Resolution 2022-## or the Plan.
Option C. Not adopt Resolution 2022-## and not update the Carbon Neutrality Plan.
 
Background/History:
In 2017 the City Council established a goal to take meaningful climate action.  As part of this goal, staff were directed to develop a climate action plan. This work has evolved to include the 2018 Climate Action and Adaptation Plan, the 2021 Carbon Neutrality Plan, and this plan revision.
Key Considerations:
Global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are changing the climate in ways that threaten Flagstaff’s unique amenities and way of life. Projected changes in temperature, snowpack, water availability, and wildfire risk exacerbate existing challenges and introduce new challenges to Flagstaff’s natural resources, economy, infrastructure systems, and quality of life. While we can work to reduce Flagstaff’s contributions to those climate changes, preparing for the inevitable impacts of these changes in Flagstaff is necessary.

By taking action now to reduce the community’s emissions and prepare for climate risks, the City of Flagstaff can better protect the well-being of its residents for decades to come. There are many community benefits to climate action, while the cost of inaction is incredibly high.
Expanded Financial Considerations:
While there are proposed initiatives in the Plan that have financial implications, these initiatives will still be subject to review and approval through the regular budget process in the future. Initiatives will be evaluated against greenhouse gas emission reductions, benefits to the community, return on investment, and financial impact.
Community Benefits and Considerations:
Many of the strategies and actions in the Flagstaff Climate Action and Adaptation Plan and the Carbon Neutrality Plan will enhance the quality of life for Flagstaff residents. For example, the introduction of energy-saving equipment and behaviors not only addresses climate goals but can also lower energy costs. This plan prioritizes these “win-win” solutions that benefit both the climate and other facets of the Flagstaff community. Some co-benefits include the following: Support for low-income and disadvantaged communities. When implemented carefully and correctly, actions such as local green job training and subsidy programs for energy efficiency upgrades can be especially helpful for low-income and disadvantaged communities. Public health. Some actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions also promote healthier lifestyles, such as supporting more people walking and biking and eating less carbon-intensive foods.
 
Quality of life and well-being. Many climate actions can also improve the quality of life for Flagstaff residents, such as benefits from green jobs to the local economy and the creation of more comfortable and inviting homes through energy efficiency improvements. Local habitat, recreation, and aesthetics. In addition to enhancing ecosystem resilience, minimizing heat impacts, and storing carbon, actions that improve natural habitat can also enhance natural beauty and provide recreation opportunities for visitors and residents. Economic stability. Looking ahead can help the Flagstaff community prepare for potential shifts in both climate and visitation. Climate action can help existing businesses be more resilient amidst change, while emerging businesses capitalizing on the need for climate solutions can create high-quality jobs.
Community Involvement:
CONSULT:
Staff utilized used several different strategies to engage thousands of community members in the original development of both the Carbon Neutrality Plan and the Climate Action and Adaptation Plan.

Attachments: Res. 2022-59
Revised CNP - tracked changes
Revised CNP - no tracking
Revised CNP - Revision Index
Powerpoint
 
11.E.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Paul Lasiewicki, Deputy Police Chief
Co-Submitter: Dan Musselman
Date: 11/22/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE:
Consideration and Adoption of Ordinance No. 2022-34: Nuisance Vehicle Noise Ordinance
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
At the December 6, 2022 Council Meeting:
1) Read Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only for the first time
2) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only (if approved above)
At the December 20, 2022 Council Meeting:
3) Read Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only for the final time
4) City Clerk reads Ordinance No. 2022-34 by title only (if approved above)
5) Adopt Ordinance No. 2022-34
Executive Summary:
In October of 2019, a Flagstaff resident emailed the Mayor and Council to express his concerns about unnecessary noise pollution. The resident specifically pointed out a concern about vehicles equipped with “intentionally loud automobile mufflers” and went on to say “I can't count the number of times that I have been assaulted by blasts of noise from cars spewing their deep and threatening engine vibrato.  Their abuse can be heard, even felt, from blocks away”.
 
This email was followed up by a petition to the Flagstaff City Council containing 29 signatures titled “Intentional Noise Pollution”. This petition requested the City Council consider the effects of noise pollution on the quality of life in Flagstaff. It asks the Council to address the unnecessary noise created when drivers intentionally modify a vehicle for the sole purpose of increasing their noise footprint.
 
These concerns were presented to Council during the June 1, 2021, regular council meeting. After the presentation the Council voted to have an ordinance drafted to address nuisance noise.

An ordinance was presented to Council on September 21, 2021. At the conclusion of that discussion Council requested a work session to further discuss a possible ordinance.
 
On January 25 of this year, Police Department staff presented the proposed noise ordinance with different options for enforceable sound levels and qualities to Council for their consideration. At that time, Council directed the City to hire a consultant to conduct a sound study and provide recommendations for noise enforcement. On June 22 MD Acoustics, the hired consultant, provided Police Department staff with a report detailing their findings and recommendations.
 
The Flagstaff Police Department has facilitated several community outreach efforts, including two Coffee with a Cop events at local coffee shops, a neighborhood meeting at the Murdoch Center, and a town hall meeting at City Hall in an effort to solicit input on the ordinance from Flagstaff citizens most impacted by the elements of the proposed ordinance.
 
On October 18 City Council provided guidance to create two separate Nuisance Noise Ordinances: one regulating vehicle noise and one regulating noise from fixed sources. Additional direction was given to staff on the Nuisance Vehicle Noise ordinance. We are here today for any further discussion on the attached Draft Nuisance Vehicle Noise ordinance.
Financial Impact:
If the Council approves City Code 6-08-001-0004, there will be a need to purchase the proper sound level meters necessary for enforcement. In addition, enforcement personnel will need to attend the necessary training to become certified in the meter’s use. Certification and continued recertification in the use of a class 2 decibel meter would be necessary for the Police Officer or Code Enforcement Officer to testify in court.

Each person operating the sound level meter for enforcement would need to receive initial training/certification and continued recertification prior to its use. Currently, a five-day Community Noise Enforcement Certification Course is offered by Rutgers at the Rutgers Noise Technical Assistance Center (RNTAC). This training is offered in a Webex (online) format. The cost for attending the certification training is $625. The recertification class, which is required every 24 months, is $325.

Additional information can be found at: https://envsci.rutgers.edu/rntac/schedule.html.

The plan is to train one Patrol Lieutenants, all five Police Officers who are assigned to the traffic enforcement squad, and two Police Officers on each of the eight patrol squads for a total of 22 personnel out of the 118 authorized sworn officers. The training currently costs $625 per person.  

For the above planned 22 officers to attend the training, the training cost will be $13,750.
 
We will need to purchase 22 sound level meter kits (containing a meter, wind screen and calibrator) at $930 per unit for a material cost of $20,460.
 
The officers are required to re-cert every 2 years at accost of $325 per re-certification. 

Due to officer attrition, we will be asking for line item to conduct re-certifications and additional certifications (for new officers) as we replace officers who leave. The best estimate is that this yearly cost will be $5,000 - $10,000.
 
These costs have been approved as a part of the COF FY2022-2023 budget.
Policy Impact:
This will provide a tool for officers to educate the public and take enforcement action on vehicles that are excessively loud.
Connection to PBB Priorities/Objectives, Carbon Neutrality Plan & Regional Plan:
Safe and Healthy Community
Foster a safe, secure, and healthy community

Provide public safety with the resources, staff and training to respond to community needs.
 
Has There Been Previous Council Decision on This:
No.
Options and Alternatives:
Council can choose to approve or to not approve the Nuisance Vehicle Noise Ordinance.
Community Involvement:
Several citizens have approached members of Council and expressed their support for a nuisance vehicle noise ordinance.

Attachments: Draft Ordinance
 
12.A.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Stacy Saltzburg, City Clerk
Date: 11/18/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE
Future Agenda Item Request (F.A.I.R.): A Citizens' Petition titled Timely Public Access to Traffic Study Data
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Council direction. 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
In accordance with Art. II, Sect. 17 of the Flagstaff City Charter, any citizen may present a written petition to the City Manager, signed by a minimum of 25 citizens from the City...who shall present it to the Council at its next regular meeting. The attached petition was filed with the City Clerk's Office on November 15, 2022, requesting that the City Council establish a policy requiring staff to provide traffic study data to the public within 15 days of any request, or at least 7 days prior to any meeting (e.g. City Council, Transportation or Planning & Zoning Commissions, etc.) set to discuss the findings and allow the public to present their interpretation of the data.
INFORMATION:
Chapter 1-12 of the Flagstaff City Code formalizes the information to be required, and the attached petition conforms to those requirements. As outlined in this chapter, the petition is to be submitted to the Council under Future Agenda Item Request (F.A.I.R.) to determine if there is Council interest in placing the item on a future agenda for consideration.

Attachments: Petition #2022-07
 
12.B.
         
CITY OF FLAGSTAFF
STAFF SUMMARY REPORT
To: The Honorable Mayor and Council
From: Stacy Saltzburg, City Clerk
Date: 11/18/2022
Meeting Date: 12/06/2022

TITLE
Future Agenda Item Request (F.A.I.R.): A Citizens' Petition titled Traffic Calming in Boulder Pointe.
STAFF RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Council direction. 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
In accordance with Art. II, Sect. 17 of the Flagstaff City Charter, any citizen may present a written petition to the City Manager, signed by a minimum of 25 citizens from the City...who shall present it to the Council at its next regular meeting. The attached petition was filed with the City Clerk's Office on November 15, 2022, requesting that the City Council direct staff to continue working with residents to develop an expanded system of traffic calming features in Boulder Pointe.
INFORMATION:
Chapter 1-12 of the Flagstaff City Code formalizes the information to be required, and the attached petition conforms to those requirements. As outlined in this chapter, the petition is to be submitted to the Council under Future Agenda Item Request (F.A.I.R.) to determine if there is Council interest in placing the item on a future agenda for consideration.

Attachments: Petition #2022-08